Saginaw Bay Resiliency Summit

Event Date: 8/15/2018

The Saginaw Bay Resiliency Summit will take place from 10am to 3pm on August 15 at the Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center in Frankenmuth.

The free summit will explore the impact of extreme storms and flooding in the Saginaw Bay region and look at strategies for resilience. Decision makers, planners, residents, and other interested partners are encouraged to attend.

Topics include hazard mitigation strategies, green infrastructure, and more. Summit keynote speaker, Mike Sobocinski from the Michigan State Police, will share information about hazard mitigation planning in the context of the Saginaw Bay watershed. There also will be time for networking over the provided lunch. 

Summit venue:

Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center
3775 S. Reese Road
Frankenmuth, MI 48734

For questions or accessibility needs, contact:

Meaghan Gass at gassmeag@msu.edu or (989) 895-4026 ext. 5

Please share the Saginaw Bay Resiliency Summit opportunity with your networks.

Farmers needed to test EnviroImpact tool

With the tool, farmers can better determine when to apply manure as a fertilizer source with lower runoff risks.

By Meaghan Gass and Erica Rogers

Farm machinery shown in a field spreading manure. Utilizing manure as a fertilizer source can be a cost-effective way for farmers to meet crop nutrient needs, and with effective application, be environmentally sustainable. Photo: Beth Ferry, MSU Extension

Utilizing manure as a fertilizer source can be a cost-effective way for farmers to meet crop nutrient needs, and with effective application, be environmentally sustainable. Photo: Beth Ferry, MSU Extension

Are you a farmer applying manure to your farm fields? Then your help is needed to test the Michigan EnviroImpact tool.

The MI EnviroImpact tool is a decision-support tool for short-term manure application planning that shows daily runoff risks across Michigan. The tool’s runoff risk forecast comes from real-time precipitation and temperature forecasts, which are combined with snow melt, soil moisture, and landscape characteristics in order to forecast runoff events. With the tool, farmers can better determine when to apply manure as a fertilizer source with lower runoff risks.

MI EnviroImpact Tool Website Screen Shot

Reducing risk of runoff

Nutrients found in manure and commercial fertilizers, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, can enter rivers and streams as runoff, and in Michigan, almost all of our waterways flow to the Great Lakes. When it rains, these nutrients have the potential to wash into nearby waterways, which can cause an excess of nutrients and lead to algae overgrowth, or harmful algal blooms. These algal blooms can have a big impact on the Great Lakes watershed as they consume oxygen that fish need to survive and can affect the quality of drinking water. With manure application planning, farmers are able reduce the risk of nutrient runoff and help better protect the Great Lakes.

Manure application is just one source of harmful algal blooms, but with proper planning, farmers can help keep applied manure nutrients on their fields and reduce runoff entering the Great Lakes.

Pilot program seeks farmers to help

Currently, tool developers are recruiting farmers to pilot the MI EnviroImpact tool. If you are interested in piloting the tool and sharing a testimonial, please contact Erica Rogers (email: roger392@msu.edu; Phone: 989-875-5233, ext. 5296). Farmer input and feedback could be used in promotional materials to highlight the tool and how farmers can use it as a decision support tool to reduce runoff risk.

The Michigan EnviroImpact Tool was developed in partnership with the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration National Weather ServiceMichigan Department of Agriculture and Rural DevelopmentMichigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance ProgramMichigan State University Institute of Water ResearchMichigan Sea Grant and MSU Extension. The tool is part of a regional effort to improve runoff risk decision support tools in the Great Lakes basin supported by the Environmental Protection AgencyGreat Lakes Restoration Initiative, and National Weather Service North Central River Forecast Center.

Get ready to celebrate Earth Day

Saginaw Bay region hosting hands-on activities on April 21, 2018 to celebrate Earth Day.

Litter cleanups are an easy way to protect our Great Lakes, promote healthy ecosystems and celebrate Earth Day. Photo: Stephanie Gandulla

Litter cleanups are an easy way to protect our Great Lakes, promote healthy ecosystems and celebrate Earth Day. Photo: Stephanie Gandulla

Earth Day celebrates our planet’s natural resources each year on April 22. First celebrated in 1970 with the support of Gaylord Nelson, former U.S. senator from Wisconsin, Earth Day signals the launch of the modern environmental movement. From hosting events to raise community awareness about environmental issues to leading stewardship efforts, there are many ways to celebrate. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has a list of Earth Day activities around the state, and in the Saginaw Bay region, community members have many opportunities.

  • At 8:30 a.m. April 21, 2018, Bay City residents can participate in Ed Golson’s 24th Annual Compost Event, where they can pick up compost at a site under Vet’s Bridge. Compost has many gardening benefits and is an efficient way to break down organic waste. Participants must bring their own shovel and container for this self-serve event. At 9 a.m., there will be two litter cleanups hosted at Golson Park (Boat Launch) and the River Walk & Rail Trail (800 John F. Kennedy Dr.). For more information on these opportunities, please visit Bay City’s Earth Day event page.
  • Bay County Extension 4-H Tech Wizards also have an event this year in partnership with the City Market. Participating the Earth Day Bag Project, 4-H members will learn about the impact of single-use plastics on our Great Lakes and ocean and will share the information with the public by decorating paper grocery bags. The decorated bags will be given to customers April 21 at the City Market to raise awareness about the importance of refusing to single use. 
  • Volunteers also are welcome to join U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 21, in Saginaw for an Earth Day Clean-up. Participants will tally litter found, and by removing the debris, they will help improve habitat for the migratory waterfowl.
  • The Children’s Zoo in Saginaw is also hosting an Earth Day event as their season opener from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 21. There will be games and activities with the support of the Mid Michigan Waste Authority. The first 400 people with a recyclable beverage container will receive free admission.
  • In Midland, the 13th Annual Earth Day Expo will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 21 at the Midland Center for the Arts. Co-sponsored by the Alden B. Dow Museum of Science and Art, the American Chemical Society – Midland Section and Midland Recyclers, this free event offers hands-on activities connecting to the theme, “Dive into Water Chemistry.”

Celebrating our Earth and its natural resources does not need to be limited to just Earth Day. Here are some daily practices that reduce waste and also protect our Great Lakes and oceans. Using the NOAA Marine Debris Tracker Application or the Alliance for the Great Lakes Adopt-a-Beach program, community members can organize their own litter cleanups, where they also collect citizen science data. Communities can help reduce marine debris by raising awareness about the common types of litter found locally.

‘Alexis Rockman: The Great Lakes Cycle’ is a must-see art exhibit for Great Lakes lovers

Paintings reveal the hidden life beneath the beautiful inland seas.

If you love the waters and creatures of the Great Lakes, you won’t want to miss the chance to see the Alexis Rockman: The Great Lakes Cycle exhibition at the Grand Rapids Art Museum. But don’t delay — the magnificent art exhibit is nearing the end of its three-month run and will only be in town through April 29, 2018. After that Michiganders will have to wait until 2020 for the paintings to return to the state.

The art museum commissioned the artist to research and create five mural-sized paintings depicting the past, present, and future of the Great Lakes. Over the course of four years, Rockman traveled the Great Lakes region, met with scientists and other experts, and created this special display. Included in the exhibit are murals, watercolors, and field drawings.

Detail of a Lake Trout from Forces of Change panel

Rockman’s five mural-sized paintings are filled with information and detail. His paintings have been described as “visual essays” and indeed tell a story which invokes wonder, appreciation, and also apprehension for the future of these critical waters. It’s an important story for all of us to learn and know.

A critical resource

The Great Lakes — Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario, and their connecting channels — form the largest surface fresh water system on earth. Environmental stewardship, sustainable economic development, and responsible use of the Great Lakes are crucial components of keeping the lakes and the region vibrant. Rockman’s exhibit challenges viewers to remember how actions and decisions often have ripple effects on the lakes. Several of the large panels can be “read” from left to right, telling the evolutionary story and showing scientific and cultural timelines. Reading these paintings, one can’t help but wonder what’s next for these important waters and be challenged to be a better steward of them for future generations.

For the museum visitor, drawing keys help tell the story and identify each element contained in the large panels. The museum has also created a Great Lakes bingo game to capture the imagination of children and adults, but also impart facts and knowledge. Playing the game encourages real study of the individual elements of the panels.

watercolor of wood duck with sand embelishments

The watercolors and field study drawings are magnificent as well. In the field studies, Rockman has included sand, dirt, and other elements he collected during his travels around the region. For example, his Common Snapping Turtle includes sand from Pictured Rocks, and his rendering of a wood duck includes sand from the Cuyahoga River.

Book a bonus you won’t want to miss

To add to the experience of viewing Rockman’s paintings, be sure to pick up a copy of the exhibition catalogue, which was published by the art museum in association with Michigan State University Press. The book’s essays, descriptions, and beautiful photographs make it a perfect way to enhance — and remember — the experience of standing in front of one of Rockman’s beautiful paintings. The catalogue was written by Dana Friis-Hansen, director of the Grand Rapids Art Museum, with contributions by Jeff Alexander and Thyrza Nichols Goodeve. One suggestion would be to order and read the book first, then see the exhibit. At the very least, grab one at the museum store to study at leisure. The book also includes the detailed keys that explain each element of the large panels.

After leaving Grand Rapids, the exhibit will tour the Great Lakes region. The tour schedule will wrap up back in Michigan in 2020 with its visit to the Flint Institute of Arts. For more information, visit the Grand Rapids Art Museum’s website at www.artmuseumgr.org or contact Visitor Services at (616) 831-1000 or info@artmuseumgr.org.

Exhibition Touring Schedule:

IPPSR Forum: Great Lakes Health

Event Date: 3/28/2018

Major threats to the world’s largest freshwater resource – the Great Lakes – will be on topic at the next Michigan State University Institute for Public Policy and Social Research’s Public Policy Forum.

The Forum is set for Wednesday, March 28 at 11:30 a.m. It is free, and the public is encouraged to attend.

“The Great Lakes have long come under financial and environmental pressure,” said IPPSR Director Matt Grossmann. Forum panelists will explore the lakes’ connections to human and economic health and look at recommendations for continued restoration efforts, he said.

Threats to continued funding have sparked major questions about the region’s ability to battle toxic and nutrient pollution, invasive species and habitat decline.

Panelists include:

  • Rick Hobrla, Program Manager for Areas of Concern and Great Lakes Coordination, Office of Great Lakes, Michigan Department of Natural Resources.
  • Anthony Kendall, Assistant Professor, Landscape Hydrology, MSU College of Natural Science.
  • Rochelle Sturtevant, AIS Outreach – Michigan Sea Grant, GLANSIS Program Manager – NOAA.
  • Ron Kinnunen, Senior District Extension Educator, MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

All IPPSR Forums take place in the Mackinac Room, 5th floor of the Cora B. Anderson House Office Building (HOB) at 124 N. Capitol Avenue in downtown Lansing. A light luncheon is served, making reservations necessary. Reserve online or call 517-355-6672 to register.

IPPSR’s spring 2018 lineup of Public Policy Forums stretches to five this year. Upcoming topics yet this spring are:

  • Career and Technical Education, Wednesday, April 18, 2018.
  • Michigan Foster Care and Group Homes, Wednesday,  May 2, 2018.

IPPSR is part of MSU’s College of Social Science and is the home for the Michigan Political Leadership Program, the Office for Survey Research, the State of the State SurveyState of the State Podcast , Michigan Policy Insiders Panel and the Correlates of State Policy.

CONTACT: AnnMarie Schneider, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research, annmarie@msu.edu517-353-1738; Cindy Kyle, IPPSR, kylec@msu.edu517-355-6672

New invasive species volunteer stewardship program coming to Michigan

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, Part 4: Michigan Sea Grant receives funding to start program for paddlers.

The Paddling Detection, Reporting and Public Awareness Program will be conducted statewide on and around 12 established Michigan water trails. Map Credit: Land Information Access Association

The Paddling Detection, Reporting and Public Awareness Program will be conducted statewide on and around 12 established Michigan water trails. Map Credit: Land Information Access Association

National Invasive Species Week 2018 is Feb. 26 to March 2. Invasive species are plants, animals, and other organisms that are not traditionally found in a given location (in this case the Great Lakes) AND they have a negative impact of some kind, whether ecological, economic, social, and/or a public health threat. To increase awareness of Michigan’s invasive species, Michigan State University Extension and Michigan Sea Grant are publishing a series of articles featuring resources and programs in our state working on invasive species issues.

Today’s article features the “Michigan Invasive Species Paddling Detection, Reporting and Public Awareness Program” a new initiative funded by the Michigan Invasive Species Grant Program.

Fastest-growing outdoor activity

According to recent studies by the Outdoor Industry Association, paddlesports are among the fastest-growing outdoor activities in the United States, and that enthusiasm is reflected in a rapidly developing system of water trails all over Michigan. Along with fantastic recreational opportunities, the increased availability and use of water trails also brings challenges including concerns over the possibility of these activities becoming a more prevalent vector for the introduction or spread of invasive species.

Invasive species can be hitchikers

Many aquatic invasive species (AIS) are spread through movement of boats between impacted areas and non-impacted areas. Much has been done in Michigan to educate motorized boaters on how to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species by properly cleaning, draining and drying motorized boats. A network of volunteer inspectors also exists for motorized boat launch locations throughout the state. However, less effort has been put into non-motorized boater education and outreach. While some paddlers may encounter these volunteer inspectors, these interactions are serendipitous. This new program will be a targeted education and outreach campaign for paddlers to “adopt” stretches of a water trail to detect and report aquatic invasive species, helping to fill the current void in paddler engagement and helping to prevent the introduction and/or slow the spread of invasive species from recreational paddling activities.

Water trail users are key

The new AIS Paddling Stewardship Program aims to help water trail users identify and map invasive species along sections of at least 12 water trails throughout Michigan. It will also offer education on best practices for preventing the introduction or spread of invasive species through paddlesport activities.

By working directly with paddling groups and other volunteers, and by using proven and established campaigns and tools such as the Clean Boats, Clean Waters program; Clean. Drain. Dry.; Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers!; and the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN) smartphone app, we can provide new opportunities to assist in monitoring and reporting the presence of invasive species in areas that may otherwise go unmonitored. In addition, through educational signage, videos and a volunteer-based public awareness program, we can provide greater awareness about how to limit the introduction and spread of invasive species among paddlers as well as non-paddlers.

A yellow kayak is seen beached on the side of the lake near a pier. A stand of invasive purple loosestrife is nearby.

Program materials, training resources and volunteer tool kits will be developed in 2018 and paddling workshops will be offered beginning in the spring of 2019.

Those interested in enrolling in the 2019 training workshops should send their name and city of residence to Mary Bohling at bohling@msu.edu who will notify them when workshops in their area are scheduled.

Read the entire 2018 National Invasive Species Awareness Week series

Additional Invasive Species Resources

Who’s who in the Great Lakes?

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, Part 3: Native, non-native and invasive species are found in Michigan waters.

This poster is available at michiganseagrant.org. Photo Credit: Michigan Sea Grant

This poster is available at michiganseagrant.org. Photo Credit: Michigan Sea Grant

National Invasive Species Awareness Week is Feb. 26 to March 2, 2018. The goal is to draw attention to invasive species and what individuals can do to stop the spread and introduction of them. This effort is sponsored by a diverse set of partners from across the country. To increase awareness of Michigan’s invasive species, Michigan State University Extension and Michigan Sea Grant are publishing a series of articles featuring resources and programs in our state working on invasive species issues.

Invasive species are plants, animals, and other organisms that are not traditionally found in a given location (in this case the Great Lakes) AND are having a negative impact of some kind, whether ecological, economic, social, and/or a public health threat

Today’s article takes a look at a few of the invasive fish species living in our Great Lakes. Michigan Sea Grant’s poster Fins, Tails and Scales – Learning about Great Lakes Fishes is a great resource for learning how to tell the difference between them.

More than 160 species

There are more than 160 species of fish that inhabit the waters of the Great Lakes region. While many look similar in shape and size, each belongs to a family that exhibits particular characteristics. These distinguishing features, combined with information on geographic range and behavior, help us observe and identify specific species. A native fish is one that traditionally belongs in the Great Lakes.

Non-native vs. invasive

A non-native fish is one that wouldn’t normally be found in Michigan or the Great Lakes, however not all non-native fish species are invasive. Chinook salmon are an example of a non-native fish introduced to the Great Lakes to enhance the state’s sports fishery and to help control the alewife population. They are not considered an invasive species.

Examples of invasive species

The Fish, Tails and Scales poster provides specific information about invasive fish species, the harm they are doing, how they likely came to be in the Great Lakes. It also has identifying characteristics and efforts to remove them or prevent them from spreading to uninfected areas. Here are just two of the invasive species that cause problems in our Great Lakes:

  • The sea lamprey, first recorded in the 1830’s in Lake Ontario, likely entered from the Erie Canal and later spread westward with the construction of the Welland Canal in the 1920s. Sea lamprey can kill up to 40 pounds of fish in their lifetime. An integrated sea lamprey control program has had great success in the Great Lakes and has reduced numbers of the spawning sea lamprey by about 90 percent. Without the control program sea lamprey would increase in numbers again in the Great Lakes. Read more about this program.
  • Round and tubenose goby originate from the Ponto-Caspian Sea region and arrived in the Great Lakes in ballast water of international cargo vessels. Both goby species can disrupt the food web by consuming insect larvae, large invertebrates, fish eggs and small fish. They are bottom-dwellers and voracious eaters that feed day and night.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources provides distribution maps and scientific illustrations of species from “An Atlas of Michigan Fishes with Keys and Illustrations” as an aid in identification.

Michigan Sea Grant helps to foster economic growth and protect Michigan’s coastal, Great Lakes resources through education, research and outreach. A collaborative effort of the University of Michigan and Michigan State University and its MSU Extension, Michigan Sea Grant is part of the NOAA-National Sea Grant network of 33 university-based programs.

GLANSIS: A ‘one-stop shop’ for information on aquatic invaders

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, Part 2: The Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System provides profiles, maps, and further reading for scientists and citizens alike.

Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System (GLANSIS) map shows the number of nonindigenous species by Great Lakes watershed.

Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System (GLANSIS) map shows the number of nonindigenous species by Great Lakes watershed.

National Invasive Species Awareness Week this year is Feb. 26 to March 2, 2018. The goal is to draw attention to invasive species and what individuals can do to stop the spread and introduction of them. This effort is sponsored by a diverse set of partners from across the country. To increase awareness of Michigan’s invasive species, Michigan State University Extension and Michigan Sea Grant are publishing a series of articles featuring resources and programs in our state working on invasive species issues.

This article features the Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System (GLANSIS) which provides profiles, maps, and further reading for scientists and citizens alike.

Aquatic invasive species have been a serious problem for the Great Lakes since the 1800s. By the mid-1990s, the Great Lakes were facing an invasion rate of nearly two new species every year. Across the globe, hundreds of species seemed to be on the move, and information about them was changing on a daily basis. In late 2002, Dr. Dave Reid of NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) realized the need for a “one-stop” comprehensive database on aquatic nonindigenous species in the Great Lakes. Funding was secured, Dr. David Raikow was brought on to develop and manage the fledgling database, and in 2005, GLANSIS—the Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System—was launched with basic information and bibliographies on 139 established nonindigenous species.

Numbers keep growing

As of 2018, 187 aquatic nonindigenous species are established in the Great Lakes, where many of them negatively impact environmental, economic, and human health. These introduced animals, plants, and microorganisms can disrupt food webs, outcompete native species, clog waterways, and even transmit parasites and disease. The ability to accurately identify these species, track their spread, and access information about how to control them is a necessity for environmental researchers and resource managers.

GLANSIS is designed to meet these needs and more. Hosted by GLERL and currently funded by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), the database provides identification and management information, maps of sightings, and reference material for more than 250 nonindigenous and watchlist species in the Great Lakes basin. A partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species database enables GLANSIS to provide a seamless interface with their database of reports for the inland lakes. The list generator search feature allows users to look up information by scientific and common names, taxonomic groups, and specific lakes and their drainages to generate species lists and access information about each species. Another tool, the map explorer, displays all sightings of a chosen species on habitat map layers provided by the Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework (GLAHF). The map explorer also allows users to quickly map sightings of selected “hot button” species like grass carp and rusty crayfish with a single click.

Who can use GLANSIS?

While GLANSIS was originally designed for use by scientists and environmental managers, this publicly-accessible tool can be used by teachers, students, anglers, property owners, and anyone who wants to learn more about invasive species in the Great Lakes. Citizens and stakeholders can help protect their local waterways by learning how to recognize, report, and stop the spread of aquatic invaders.

  • Are you a science teacher building a lesson plan on invasive species? Use the GLANSIS search portal to generate a list of species in your local waterway.
  • A student researching a chosen species for a class assignment? Check out the non-technical profiles produced by Indiana-Illinois Sea Grant to learn more about your species in plain language or access our glossary to help you understand technical reports.
  • A lake association member? Download the list of invasives for your lake (and nearby lakes, so you know what to watch for.) 
  • A researcher interested in how habitat type affects patterns of invasion? Use the map explorer to find species sightings, download them to your own GIS or use GLAHF’s habitat layers for better insight on how environmental conditions might influence their spread.
  • A property owner, fisherman or beachgoer who has found something unusual? Report your finding to us.
  • An undergraduate or graduate student looking for a project idea? Check profiles for what we don’t know or where there are gaps in the current state of the science.

To use GLANSIS and learn more about nonindigenous aquatic species in waterways near you, explore the website at https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/glansis/.

For assistance in using the database or suggestions for additional information that GLANSIS should provide, contact Rochelle.Sturtevant@noaa.gov or Erika.Lower@noaa.gov.

Read the entire 2018 National Invasive Species Awareness Week series

Additional Invasive Species Resources

Clean Marina Classroom Live: Harrison Township

Event Date: 3/27/2018

When: March 27, 2018
Where: Thomas Welsh Activity Center, Lake St. Clair Metropark, 31300 Metro Parkway, Harrison Township, MI 48045
Workshop Host: Joe Hall and Sue Knapp

The Clean Marina Classroom is going on the road! In spring 2018, the Michigan Clean Marina Program will offer several in-person workshops. Michigan Sea Grant staff and Clean Marina certification specialists will cover important lessons from the online classroom tied to mandatory and recommended best practices for becoming a Clean Marina. Pledged marinas, as well as marinas due for re-certification in 2018, are invited to attend.

For the Classroom Live workshop to be effective, participants must take the following steps before the workshop:

    • Register for the workshop (dates and locations below).
    • Sign the Clean Marina pledge form (new and re-certifying marinas) and pay the required pledge fee (new marinas only).
    • Log in to the online classroom and complete the marina self-assessment (also called the certification checklist).
    • Bring your self-assessment, a notebook (paper and pencil or laptop) and your calendar to the workshop.

In return, each marina will leave with:

  • Clean Marina Classroom certificate
  • Scheduled certification site visit date
  • Prize for completing the workshop evaluation and survey

Other Locations

Petoskey

When: March 14, 2018
Where: City of Petoskey Winer Sports Park, 1100 Winter Park Lane Petoskey, MI 49770
Workshop Host: Kendall Klingelsmith, City of Petoskey Marina

Clean Marina Classroom Live: Petoskey

Event Date: 3/14/2018

When: March 14, 2018
Where: City of Petoskey Winer Sports Park, 1100 Winter Park Lane Petoskey, MI 49770
Workshop Host: Kendall Klingelsmith, City of Petoskey Marina

The Clean Marina Classroom is going on the road! In spring 2018, the Michigan Clean Marina Program will offer several in-person workshops. Michigan Sea Grant staff and Clean Marina certification specialists will cover important lessons from the online classroom tied to mandatory and recommended best practices for becoming a Clean Marina. Pledged marinas, as well as marinas due for re-certification in 2018, are invited to attend.

For the Classroom Live workshop to be effective, participants must take the following steps before the workshop:

    • Register for the workshop (dates and locations below).
    • Sign the Clean Marina pledge form (new and re-certifying marinas) and pay the required pledge fee (new marinas only).
    • Log in to the online classroom and complete the marina self-assessment (also called the certification checklist).
    • Bring your self-assessment, a notebook (paper and pencil or laptop) and your calendar to the workshop.

In return, each marina will leave with:

  • Clean Marina Classroom certificate
  • Scheduled certification site visit date
  • Prize for completing the workshop evaluation and survey

Other Locations

Harrison Township

When: March 27, 2018
Where: Thomas Welsh Activity Center, Lake St. Clair Metropark, 31300 Metro Parkway, Harrison Township, MI 48045
Workshop Host: Joe Hall and Sue Knapp