Teachers: GLEP Registration Open

Event Date: 4/23/2018
End Date: 6/15/2018

Award-winning program advances Great Lakes literacy and stewardship among K-12 students throughout southeast Michigan.

Teachers: Register now for the 2018 Great Lakes Education Program and think spring!

The Great Lakes Education Program begins its 28th year of classroom and vessel-based education in April. More than 3,400 teachers have joined the program on the water over those years.

GLEP education provides teachers and students with an award-winning learning opportunity that includes classroom, vessel-based and shoreside education. Students are the future stewards of our incredible Great Lakes, and this is an effective and memorable way to engage them in both learning about the lakes and in developing a personal sense of stewardship. We share a common ownership of and stewardship responsibility for the lakes. Teachers can register their class to participate and help students understand how important the Great Lakes are in Michigan.

Helps meet science standards

The program helps teachers meet Michigan’s Grade Level Content ExpectationsMichigan K-12 Science Standards, and the regional Great Lakes Literacy principles. Not to mention that 95 percent of students report they felt more knowledgeable about Great Lakes science after participating.

More than 115,000 students and adults have joined the program and learned more about the Great Lakes since 1991. Designed as a collaborative effort of  Michigan State University ExtensionMichigan Sea Grant, the Huron-Clinton Metroparks, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Great Lakes Education Program provides students, their teachers and adult chaperones with an unforgettable on-the-water learning experience. With locations on both Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, it is easy for schools throughout southeast Michigan to participate.

Register now

Registration is now open for the spring 2018 Great Lakes Education Program season, which runs from mid-April through mid-June. For more complete information on the program, the spring season calendar, locations, cost, and how to register go to the Great Lakes Education Program website.

National Parks of the Great Lakes – Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore on mighty Lake Superior provides incredible recreational opportunities.

Kayakers paddle in Lake Superior near a sandstone cliff of Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore in Michigan. Photo: Todd Marsee, Michigan Sea Grant

Kayakers paddle in Lake Superior near a sandstone cliff of Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore in Michigan. Photo: Todd Marsee, Michigan Sea Grant

The United States National Park Service not only administers parks, it also is responsible for designated lakeshores, historic sites, battlefields, and memorials. In addition, it oversees historic and scenic trails located in the Great Lakes watershed. One of the most unique National lakeshores – Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore – is the focus of this second article in this series on the National Parks of the Great Lakes.

If you’ve ever visited Michigan’s Upper Peninsula between Munising to the west and Grand Marais to the east, you’ve probably seen the famous cliffs and formations for which this park is named. Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore includes 42 miles of Lake Superior coast, with colorful sandstone cliffs – some reaching 200 feet in height – extending along 15 miles of shoreline. Impressive in themselves, you can also find where they have been sculpted by nature into arches, caves – both above and below the water’s surface.

Lots to do

But there is much more to this lakeshore than just colorful cliffs. Miles of lovely beaches and huge sand dunes, forest trails, shipwrecks, and waterfalls are also along this part of the Lake Superior coast. Campers and hikers will enjoy the 100 miles of hiking trails. The park’s website can direct hikers to short day jaunts or longer treks. Backcountry camping is available but permits are required. Also, it is important to be prepared so visit the website for many good suggestions on what equipment and safety precautions you should take while visiting the park as well as a calendar of events and how to plan your trip.

Interested in maritime history? You can learn about the U.S. Lifesaving Service, the U.S. Lighthouse Service, and the U.S. Coast Guard at multiple sites along the shore, such as the Au Sable Light Station. And don’t miss the Alger Underwater Preserve in Munising, which features shipwrecks, educational glass bottom boat tours, interpretive underwater trails, and sea caves (see Michigan’s underwater preserves offer unique views of Great Lakes maritime heritage for more on Michigan’s underwater preserve system).

Artwork by Todd Marsee a watercolor landscape inspired by Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.

Art in the park

One of the unique opportunities offered at many National Parks, including Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, is the Artist-in-Residence program. Residencies usually last 2-4 weeks and artists share their art with park visitors. This past summer Todd Marsee, Michigan Sea Grant’s senior graphic designer, served as artist-in-residence at Pictured Rocks. Todd shared his thoughts about his experience:

“Being chosen from a pool of applicants to be the Artist in Residence (AIR) at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore was a huge honor. I was fortunate to have this time to focus on my painting – off the grid. In these days of constant digital chatter, I found it extremely rewarding, as I produced 20 paintings at the cabin, and 6 additional in the works. My camera was with me all the time, capturing the many moods of Lake Superior. These photos helped inspire many paintings and are also being used here at Michigan Sea Grant. I was able to experience the shoreline when the Lake was smooth as glass and when there were waves nearing 10 feet in the open water. I saw the juxtaposition of nature’s beauty and awesome power all in one place.

The North Country Trail is literally right on the edge of the Lake in many places. It meanders into the woods for parts of the hike, but you are rewarded with an amazing Lake vista every time the path meets back up to the water. Color was a big inspiration in the work produced during the AIR. When the lighting is just right, the Lake is a brilliant blend of greens and blues. Rock hunting also brings all sorts of bright colors.”

If you’re an artist, check into the artist-in-residence program at many of the National Parks. And even if you’re not an artist, you’ll find that Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore offers an incredible experience for you and your entire family.  Contact the Munising Falls Visitor Center, 1505 Sand Point Road, Munising, MI (phone 906-387-4310) for more information.

Read the National Parks of the Great Lakes series

National Parks of the Great Lakes should be on your bucket list

U.S., Canada have each preserved lakeshores and parks of these beautiful natural resources.

Voyageurs National Park Photo courtesy NPS

Voyageurs National Park Photo courtesy NPS

Are you someone who loves to travel? If so, you have probably visited at least one or two of our National Parks. And you probably have a list of additional parks you’d like to visit when times allows. The good news for those of us in the Great Lakes region is that we have many National Parks at our doorstep – or more appropriately, shoreline – than in many other parts of North America.

On the American side of the Great Lakes, the National Park Service has set aside special areas, called units in the National Park System, to preserve “the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations.” These include three National Parks and four National Seashores. On the Canadian side, Parks Canada has done much the same, designating six National Parks, one National Marine Park, and one National Marine Conservation Area.

In the coming months we’ll be getting to know the varied parks on both sides of the border through a series of articles looking at their diverse natures and locations. From the Isle Royale and Voyageurs National Parks in the U.S., to the Georgian Bay Islands and Bruce Peninsula National Parks in Canada, we’ll see just how special these areas are and how they highlight some of the most unique features of the Great Lakes. Following are a couple of teasers to spark your interest in some of the articles ahead.

Do you know which parks can be found in the world’s largest freshwater archipelago? Or which park is at the southernmost point of the Canadian mainland? Do you know which Great Lakes park is the only U.S. national park to completely close during the winter? To get the answers to these questions and discover a host of fascinating facts about our Great Lakes national parks, look for the upcoming articles in this series.

Apply Now for NOAA Teacher at Sea Program

Event Date: 11/30/2017

For more than 25 years, teachers have traveled aboard NOAA research vessels around the world through the NOAA Teacher at Sea Program. Applications for 2018 are now being accepted.

June Tiesas (left) is on deck the Oregon II during her Teacher at Sea program with NOAA.

June Tiesas (left) is on deck the Oregon II during her Teacher at Sea program with NOAA. Courtesy photo

Are you a teacher who is interested in learning more about our world ocean and sharing that knowledge with your students and colleagues? Are you excited about the opportunity to engage in ocean research alongside of NOAA research scientists and other teachers from around the country who share your interests? And would you like to do so at NO COST? If the answer is yes, NOAA’s Teacher at Sea Program may be just what you’ve been looking for!

Teacher at Sea (TAS) has involved nearly 700 teachers since it began in 1990, with participants representing all 50 states. Eight from Michigan have participated over the past decade alone. Applicants may be classroom teachers (Pre-K through grade 12, community college, college or university), aquarium or museum educators, or adult education teachers. Teacher at Sea participants are typically on board one of NOAA’s research vessels for approximately two weeks and may participate in one of three cruise types: fisheries research, oceanographic research, or hydrographic surveys.

In 2015, June Teisan, a middle school science teacher at Harper Woods Secondary School in Harper Woods, Mich., who has collaborated with Michigan Sea Grant Extension on a number of education projects, was a Teacher at Sea on board the NOAA Ship Oregon II in the Gulf of Mexico.

“Teaching is an other-centered profession. We pour out our time and talents, passion, and praise moment by moment, hour upon hour, day after day. It’s what we love to do but it can be draining. So when the well of inspiration and energy runs dry how does a hard-working educator refuel? For me, self-selected professional development has been one way that I recharge my teaching batteries,” she states. “Over my career I’ve participated in a wide range of webinars, ed camps, conferences and internships, but one of the most powerful experiences was my time as a NOAA Teacher at Sea. Working side by side with top flight researchers 24/7 out beyond sight of land fed my inner science geek, challenged me to grow beyond the city-based bubble in which I’m comfortable, offered me a glimpse behind the scenes of NOAA’s critical role in maintaining the health of our fishery stocks, and gave me the opportunity to share this experience with my students through blog posts and connections to STEM professionals.”

NOAA wants teachers to understand how NOAA research is linked to the Next Generation Science Standards and Ocean Literacy Principles, and pathways leading to NOAA careers. They hope that as TAS alumni, teachers will use NOAA data and resources in their teaching and with colleagues. And they believe that the Teacher at Sea Program will develop an understanding of earth system science while building a workforce for STEM careers.

Applications for 2018 are now being accepted, and the deadline is November 30, 2017. Guidance on how to apply and program FAQs are available on the Teacher at Sea website.

Michigan Sea Grant receives John D. Dingell Friend of the Refuge Award

Michigan Sea Grant representatives Steve Stewart and Mary Bohling with John D. Dingell, Jr., IWRA Chairman Richard Micka, and Refuge Manager John Hartig.

Michigan Sea Grant representatives Steve Stewart and Mary Bohling with John D. Dingell, Jr., IWRA Chairman Richard Micka, and Refuge Manager John Hartig. Photo by Mark Messer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

  • Rhett Register, Michigan Sea Grant Communications Lead, (734) 647-0767, rregist@umich.edu
  • Cindy Hudson, Michigan Sea Grant Extension Communications Manager, (517) 353-9723, hudsoncy@msu.edu

The International Wildlife Refuge Alliance (IWRA) and the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge recently honored the work of Michigan Sea Grant with the John D. Dingell Friend of the Refuge Award.

Michigan Sea Grant staff have been involved with both the IWRA and the Detroit River Refuge since they were organized. The IWRA recognized Michigan Sea Grant’s continued efforts in providing classroom and vessel-based education in southeast Michigan and their ongoing commitment to the mission of both the IWRA and the Refuge.

The Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge consists of nearly 6,000 acres of unique habitat, including islands, coastal wetlands, marshes, shoals, and waterfront lands within an authorized boundary extending along 48 miles of shoreline. 

The IWRA is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting the mission and purposes of the Detroit Refuge, the only international refuge in North America. It provides many vital services to the Refuge, such as community outreach, education programs, habitat restoration, special events support, volunteer staff, advocacy, and fundraising.

“The Refuge is such a wonderful asset to the Detroit area,” said Mary Bohling, a Michigan Sea Grant Extension educator. Bohling also is a current board member and one of the original organizers of the International Wildlife Refuge Alliance. “The Alliance has been an important part of building fantastic partnerships to help protect, conserve, and manage the Refuge’s wildlife and habitats. As a Sea Grant educator, I’m very proud to have been a part of making this happen.”

Since 1991, more than 100,000 students and adults have participated in Michigan Sea Grant’s Great Lakes Education Program. In addition to classroom lessons, students, teachers, and adult chaperones board the schoolship Clinton to learn more about conservation and stewardship of our state’s Great Lakes and waterways. Soon students will be boarding the schoolship at the newly constructed fishing pier and boat dock in the Detroit Refuge Gateway. The accessible dock and fishing pier are expected to open in the fall of 2017.

“We’re honored to receive this John D. Dingell Jr. Award,” said Extension Educator Steve Stewart on behalf of Michigan Sea Grant. “We’re also looking forward to welcoming many more students on board the Clinton from the new dock at the Refuge Gateway. It is critical that students have the opportunity to experience and learn about these incredible water resources, and there is no better way to do that than on a schoolship. They will be our future decision-makers and the stewards of these incredible water resources.”

The award is named after former Michigan U.S. Congressman John D. Dingell Jr., who championed many conservation causes and legislation, and who supported the creation of the Detroit Refuge.

Michigan Sea Grant helps to foster economic growth and protect Michigan’s coastal, Great Lakes resources through education, research, and outreach. A collaborative effort of the University of Michigan and Michigan State University and its MSU Extension, Michigan Sea Grant is part of the NOAA-National Sea Grant network of 33 university-based programs.

2017 Summer Discovery Cruises

Event Date: 5/22/2017
End Date: 9/15/2017

Do you want to learn about the Great Lakes by being on the Great Lakes? If so, you will want to learn more about our 2017 Summer Discovery Cruises season!

For the 16th summer, Michigan Sea Grant Extension will provide Michiganders (and visitors to Michigan) with the opportunity to learn about the Great Lakes by being on the Great Lakes. Cruises depart from Lake Erie Metropark, with cruises on the lower Detroit River and Lake Erie, and Lake St. Clair Metropark, cruising Lake St. Clair.

The 2017 season offers more than 20 educational cruises around themes such as Fisheries, Wildlife, Wetlands, Shipwrecks, Lighthouses, Weather, Shipping and more. Cruises for educators wanting to enhance the use of Great Lakes content in their teaching are also provided, with stipends.

Some of the exciting cruises for the 2017 season include:

Lake St. Clair Fisheries – This is not a fishing cruise, but it definitely is a “fishy” cruise! Learn first-hand about the fish that are found in Lake St. Clair, many of which are available for hands-on examination during the cruise. We will be joined by a Michigan DNR Fisheries Biologist and rendezvous with their research vessel while out on the lake to observe fish tagging, measuring and other research operations.

Warfare on the Waterfront – The War of 1812, World War II, and even the American Civil War have all shaped the Detroit River and western Lake Erie. Long after the end of hostilities, remnants of this military presence can still be found. Join an Interpreter for an in-depth look at these conflicts, their sites and stories, and see how they impacted the region and the world.

Shipwreck at Sugar – Just under the waves off a crumbling Sugar Island dock lie the remains of a vessel sank in 1945. Travel with our resident historian to the wreck site to learn about the S.S. Seabreeze, the story of how it got there and the circumstances surrounding its mysterious sinking.

Birds, Boats & Booze (4 hour history cruise) – Many things brought people to the St. Clair River Delta Flats area. The abundant wetlands brought duck hunters and fishing. Wood boats and passenger steamers brought tourism and recreation, and Prohibition brought rumrunners and speakeasies to the region. Spend a little more time in “the flats” with us as we cruise farther up the South Channel and share a little of the past including stories of the big hotels, Tashmoo Park, Chris Craft boat building and more.

Great Lakes Science for Kids – Learn about the ecology of Lake St. Clair or Lake Erie, by using the tools a Great Lakes Scientist uses to determine water quality by studying the plants and animals of the lakes. Try your hand at using a plankton net, bottom dredge, water testing kit, underwater camera, and binoculars to discover the exciting nature of the lake and become a Great Lakes Scientist!

To learn about the Great Lakes by being on the Great Lakes, visit the Summer Discovery Cruises web site at www.discoverycruises.org for complete cruise descriptions, locations, dates and times, as well as directions on how to register for your 2017 Summer Discovery Cruises. Don’t miss the boat!

Schoolship offers many students their first boating experience

Great Lakes Education Program now registering classrooms in southeast Michigan to join the fun.

Thousands of students in southeast Michigan have participated in the Great Lakes Education Program. Registration for 2017 is now open. Photo: Steve Stewart | Michigan Sea Grant

Thousands of students in southeast Michigan have participated in the Great Lakes Education Program. Registration for 2017 is now open. Photo: Steve Stewart | Michigan Sea Grant

If you are a teacher in southeast Michigan and want to introduce your students to the Great Lakes, what should you do? Participating in the Great Lakes Education Program, which begins its 27th year of classroom and vessel-based education in April, is a sure way to accomplish your goal.

If you value the effectiveness of combining classroom and out-of-classroom learning, you’ll want to be a part of this award-winning program. If you appreciate how important the Great Lakes are to all of us, and that we share a common ownership of and stewardship responsibility for the lakes, you can be sure this program will make a big impact on students.

Teachers who have already participated report that it does an excellent job of helping them meet Michigan’s Grade Level Content Expectations, Michigan K-12 Science Standards, and the regional Great Lakes Literacy principles, and that 95 percent of their students felt more knowledgeable about Great Lakes science after participating.

Nearly 110,000 students and adults have learned more about the Great Lakes since 1991 by participating in the Great Lakes Education Program. Designed though a collaboration involving Michigan State University Extension, Michigan Sea Grant, the Huron-Clinton Metroparks, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the program provides students, their teachers and adult chaperones with an unforgettable on-the-water learning experience. With locations on both Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, it is easy for schools throughout southeast Michigan to participate.

Registration is now open for the spring 2017 Great Lakes Education Program season, which runs from mid-April through mid-June. For more complete information on the program, the spring season calendar, our locations, cost, and how to register, simply go to the Great Lakes Education Program website. We look forward to having you join us in 2017 as we continue our education focusing on the Great Lakes.

Detroit museum highlights importance of maritime history in Michigan

Among collections are biographies of more than 20,000 ships that have sailed on Great Lakes.

An anchor from the Edmund Fitzgerald sits on the museum lawn.

An anchor from the Edmund Fitzgerald sits on the museum lawn. Photo: Steve Stewart | Michigan Sea Grant

This is the first in a series of articles focusing on Great Lakes maritime heritage. Maritime heritage, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “preserves and protects valuable historical, cultural, and archaeological resources within our coastal, marine, and Great Lakes environments.”  The National Park Service has an active Maritime Heritage Program that “works to advance awareness and understanding of the role of maritime affairs in the history of the United States.” As the Great Lakes State, Michigan is richly blessed with maritime heritage resources, and this series will explore many of them.

In 1949, the J. T. Wing, a Great Lakes lumber schooner at the end of its sailing life – and the last commercial sailing ship on the Great Lake – was donated to the City of Detroit Historical Commission for use as a museum ship. The Wing was landlocked on Belle Isle and became a popular attraction.

When the Wing was declared unsafe for visitors in 1956, the Dossin family provided a gift that resulted in construction of the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on the same site. The museum officially opened on July 24, 1960.

The Dossin was an instant hit, attracting over 100,000 visitors in its first 5 months. In addition to a gallery of model ships and a submarine periscope, the museum installed the Gold Cup hydroplane race boat Miss Pepsi, the incredible Gothic Room from the overnight passenger steamer City of Detroit III, and the Deroy Lecture Hall. A group of supporters formed the Great Lakes Maritime Institute and began publishing Telescope magazine as well as sponsoring activities and educational events at the museum.

In 1975, the dramatic sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald in Lake Superior focused worldwide attention on the Great Lakes. A major part of the story involved the steamer William Clay Ford which headed out into the storm in an attempt to find the doomed Fitzgerald.

When the Ford was decommissioned in the 1990s, the Dossin acquired the pilot house of the ship and attached it to the river-facing side of the museum. Today it is possible to stand in the pilot house, turn the ship’s wheel and experience what it’s like to be on a Great Lakes freighter.The Dossin museum building seen from outside.

In 2006, the Dossin museum came under the auspices of the Detroit Historical Society and a new era commenced. The museum’s vast collection includes biographical information on more than 20,000 ships that have sailed the lakes, 100,000 photographs and videos, thousands of shipbuilders’ blueprints and hundreds of maritime paintings and artifacts encompassing more than 300 years of Great Lakes history. The maritime holdings gathered at the Dossin are recognized worldwide for their value to researchers.

Events that the Dossin hosts in co-sponsorship with the Great Lakes Maritime Institute include the annual Lost Mariners Remembrance in November, the Fair Winds Fall Dinner, the Holiday Marine Mart and the Dossin Invitation high school rowing regatta in the spring.

The Dossin Great Lakes Museum is, thanks to the success of the Detroit Historical Society’s Fast Forward fundraising campaign, open Wednesdays through Sundays and admission is free.

Another way to learn about our maritime heritage resources is by coming aboard for some of the Summer Discovery Cruises offered on both Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie each year. Sponsored by Michigan State University Extension, Michigan Sea Grant, and the Huron-Clinton Metroparks, Summer Discovery Cruises are a fun way to learn about our many historical, cultural, and natural Great Lakes resources.

Great Lakes freighters – and crews – get ready for ‘winter layup’

After another successful year, our Great Lakes Education schoolships join in this annual rite.

Each year, Great Lakes freighters lay up in harbors until winter passes and it's safe to venture out on the lakes. Our education schoolships also lay up over the winter.

Each year, Great Lakes freighters lay up in harbors until winter passes and it’s safe to venture out on the lakes. Our education schoolships also lay up over the winter. Photo: Lynn Vaccaro

Last winter, the first Great Lakes freighters to lay up were the Roger Blough, American Spirit, and Indiana Harbor, all of which were docked on Nov. 3. They were laid up until late March, when it became safe once again to sail the lakes.

Winter layup for the Great Lakes Education Program began this year on Oct. 28 when 28 fourth grade students from Parsons Elementary in Gibraltar, Mich., along with their chaperones and teacher, disembarked from the Education Vessel Clinton. They were the final participants of the 2016 program year (our 26th), adding their names to those from 117 other classes fortunate enough to experience the wonders of our rivers and lakes this year.

Since its start in 1991, Michigan State University Extension, Michigan Sea Grant, and the Huron-Clinton Metroparks have collaborated to bring the Great Lakes Education Program (GLEP) to nearly 110,000 students, teachers, and chaperones. The GLEP experience has allowed them to marvel at life forms as small as plankton and as large as sturgeon, measure Great Lakes water clarity, analyze levels of dissolved oxygen and pH, learn about Great Lakes geography and hydrology using navigation charts, sample the bottom using a dredge, and tie common sailing knots such as the bowline. Much more than just a field trip, GLEP education combines classroom lessons with a hands-on, vessel-based learning experience that combine to develop Great Lakes literacy and stewardship among participants.

To that number of students and teachers cruising the Great Lakes, we add 1,000+ participants in this year’s Summer Discovery Cruises (SDC) on lakes Erie and St. Clair through MSU Extension’s partnership with the Huron-Clinton Metroparks. Since its initiation in 2002, Summer Discovery Cruises have provided more than 17,000 people with opportunities to learn through a variety of special themed programs.

As the Clinton and her fleet mate Clinton Friendship arrive at the layup dock in Mt. Clemens for fresh coats of paint and a winter tune-up, we would like to take this opportunity to thank the dozens of teachers, volunteers, staff, and partners who have sailed the lakes with us to make both the Great Lakes Education Program and Summer Discovery Cruises a success.

These individuals, coupled with good planning, implementation, ongoing evaluation, and a dash of good fortune, have provided the recipe for creating and maintaining what has become a flagship program for MSU Extension. While the Clinton rests at her layup dock, MSU Extension staff will work through the winter to ensure the tradition of excellence in experiential learning that is the hallmark of the GLEP and SDC programs will continue into the 2017 season.

AmeriCorps positions offer Extension opportunities for college grads

Event Date: 9/5/2016
End Date: 9/30/2016

By Steve Stewart and Brandon Schroeder

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Michigan State University Extension and Michigan Sea Grant are collaborating with Huron Pines to recruit and work with AmeriCorps members in both southeast and northeast Michigan. Applications are now being accepted, and the deadline to apply is September 30.

If you are interested in conservation, want to make a difference, and develop your professional skills, consider joining the Huron Pines AmeriCorps team. Huron Pines AmeriCorps is designed to provide Michigan conservation organizations with highly qualified individuals for a term of volunteer service. The program not only improves a conservation organization’s ability to protect Michigan’s natural resources, but it also provides members with real-world experience and training. With a living stipend and some attractive benefits, this program provides an opportunity to develop as a resource professional in the conservation community. AmeriCorps members will be placed throughout Michigan with a variety of organizations. Member activities include volunteer engagement, habitat restoration, environmental stewardship, and developing new conservation services. Learn more about these opportunities and apply at www.huronpines.org/americorps.

In southeast Michigan, the MSU Extension (Sea Grant)—Education and Outreach Coordinator will work primarily in Macomb County and will be integral in broadening the reach of three successful programs: the Great Lakes Education Program (GLEP), serving upper elementary/middle school students and teachers; Summer Discovery Cruises (SDC), addressing the need for public education and stewardship; and Water Conservation (WC) education, serving lower elementary students and teachers. These three programs engage schools, educators, students, and the public in Great Lakes-focused experiential learning that moves participants forward in understanding their roles as Great Lakes stewards and in taking subsequent stewardship actions.

In northeast Michigan, the Northeast Michigan Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative—Education Coordinator will work primarily out of Alpena County and will support new and existing place-based education (PBE) stewardship service projects in connection with schools, youth-based development groups, and community partners participating in the Northeast Michigan Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative (NEMIGLSI) network. The Education Coordinator will plan and implement student-driven environmental stewardship projects; provide professional development opportunities connected to PBE inquiries; and identify and build relationships with community partners.