Clean Marina Classroom Live, Lansing

Event Date: 12/6/2018

The Clean Marina Classroom is going on the road, offering an in-person workshop in Lansing. Michigan Sea Grant staff and Clean Marina certification specialists will cover important lessons from the online classroom tied to mandatory and recommended best practices for becoming a Clean Marina. Pledged marinas, as well as marinas due for re-certification, are invited to attend.

For the Classroom Live workshop to be effective, participants must take the following steps before the workshop:

  1. Register for the workshop (dates and locations below).
  2. Sign the Clean Marina pledge form (new and re-certifying marinas) and pay the required pledge fee (new marinas only).
  3. Log in to the online classroom and complete the marina self-assessment (also called the certification checklist).
  4. Bring your self-assessment, a notebook (paper and pencil or laptop) and your calendar to the workshop.

In return, each marina will leave with:

  • Clean Marina Classroom certificate
  • Scheduled certification site visit date
  • Prize for completing the workshop evaluation and survey

Locations

Lansing

When: December 6, 2018, 1:30 – 6 p.m.
Where: Radisson Hotel at the Capitol, 111 N. Grand Avenue, Lansing, MI 48933
Workshop Host: MBIA

Head to Houghton for a Lake Superior Fisheries Workshop on April 30, 2018

Event Date: 4/30/2018

Presentations include updates on several important fish issues, public encouraged to attend and provide input.

flyer describes locations and dates for annual fishery workshops

Michigan Sea Grant workshops are intended to inform the angling community and general public about fish populations and management. This year, in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), our Lake Superior Fisheries Workshop will be held at Michigan Technological University in Houghton, Mich. The workshop will feature a variety of talks from the university and management agencies of the MDNR and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. The talks will help anglers and the general public understand what research is taking place on the lake and how it is informing fisheries management decisions. There will also be plenty of time for questions and answers allowing anglers to give valuable input.

The workshop will be 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. April 30, 2018, at the Great Lakes Research Center at Michigan Technological University. The address 100 Phoenix Drive, Houghton, MI 49931. Parking is free after 4 p.m. at the adjacent lot 31.

Presentations (see agenda) this year will include:

  • Buffalo Reef and Stamp Sands Updates – MDEQ and Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
  • Coaster Brook Trout Population State – MI Tech Great Lakes Research Center
  • Lake Trout Status, Updates, and Isle Royale Populations – MDNR Fisheries Division
  • Ghost Nets – WI Sea Grant
  • Lake Superior Angler Creel Data –  MDNR Fisheries Division
  • MI Tech Great Lakes Research and Facility Tour – Great Lakes Research Center

The Lake Superior Fisheries Workshop is free and open to all interested participants. Registration is requested, but walk-ins are welcome. Register online.

Don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity to learn about what is happening with the Lake Superior Fisheries!

2018 Fishery Workshops

Event Date: 4/10/2018
End Date: 5/3/2018

Michigan Sea Grant, in partnership with fisheries agencies and stakeholder organizations, hosts public information workshops annually. The workshops focus on current research and information related to the regional status of Great Lakes fisheries. These workshops are open to the public and provide valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals and other interested stakeholders. 

2018 Workshops

  • Standish
    Tuesday, April 10, 6–9 p.m.
  • Harrison Charter Township
    Thursday, April 12, 6–8:30 p.m.
  • Ubly/Bad Axe
    Thursday, April 19, 6–9 p.m.
  • South Haven
    Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:00-9:20 p.m.
  • Rogers City
    Tuesday, April 24, 6–9 p.m.
  • Houghton
    Monday, April 30, 6–9 p.m.
  • Cedarville
    Thursday, May 3, 6–9 p.m.

Lake HuronFisheries Workshops

Event Date: 4/10/2018
End Date: 5/3/2018

Register for any of 4 free workshops held in April and May and keep up-to-date on Lake Huron fisheries.

The annual fisheries workshops provide valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals, and interested community members. Photo: Michigan Sea Grant

The annual fisheries workshops provide valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals, and interested community members. Photo: Michigan Sea Grant

Lake Huron fisheries have witnessed numerous ecosystem changes resulting from invasive species, yet this changing fishery continues to offer a diverse and vibrant fishing opportunities.

Native species such as lake trout in offshore waters and walleye in Saginaw Bay and nearshore waters have rebounded and drive growing fishing opportunities. An Atlantic salmon program supported by Lake Superior State University and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division shows expanding promise for Lake Huron anglers. Concerns remain over issue of aquatic invasive species, and communities have questions about the future of cormorant control efforts as they relate to fisheries management activities. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service continues to expand efforts toward native Cisco restoration efforts, and a Lake Huron-Michigan predator diet studyled by Michigan State University Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and USGS Great Lakes Science Center  (with support from Michigan Sea Grant) continues to track food web interactions in these Great Lakes ecosystems.

How might you keep current on all these issues and topics? The 2018 Lake Huron Regional Fisheries workshop series offers an educational opportunity to keep current on the status and health, trends and fishing opportunities on Lake Huron. These annual educational workshops also offer opportunity to directly learn and ask questions with a diversity of university and agency scientists and experts who work on Lake Huron fisheries.

2018 Lake Huron Regional Fisheries Workshops

Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries DivisionUSGS Great Lakes Science Center, and local fishery organizations will host four evening workshops across Lake Huron’s coastline.

Workshops will include information and status updates on topics such as fish populations and angler catch data, forage or prey fish surveys, offshore fisheries and native lake trout, and the status of Saginaw Bay yellow perch and walleye. In addition there will be information shared on fisheries management activities, citizen science opportunities for anglers, and a variety of other Lake Huron topics of local interest. These workshops provide valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals, and interested community members.

Workshops are free and open to the public. Locations and dates include:

  • Standish (Saginaw Bay): April 10, 2018, (Tuesday, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.) at Saganing Tribal Center, 5447 Sturman Rd., Standish, MI  48658.
  • Ubly/Bad Axe: April 19, 2018, (Thursday, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.) at Ubly Fox Hunter’s Club, 2351 Ubly Rd., Bad Axe, MI 48413.
  • Rogers City: April 24, 2014, (Tuesday, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.) at Rogers City Area Seniors and Community Center, 131 Superior St., Rogers City, MI  49779.
  • Cedarville: May 3, 2018, (Thursday, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.) at Clark Township Community Center, 133 E. M-134, Cedarville, MI  49719.

Registration requested

Please register online to participate in any (or all) of these educational opportunities.

For program information or questions, contact Brandon Schroeder, Michigan Sea Grant by email or at (989) 354-9885. Workshop details for these and other Great Lakes fisheries workshops are also available online the Michigan Sea Grant website.

Despite conservation efforts, the red swamp crayfish has established a foothold in Michigan

National Invasive Species Awareness Week, Part 5: More than 5,000 red swamp crayfish have been removed, but battle continues.

Native to the southern Mississippi basin and Gulf Coast, red swamp crayfish have now been found in other parts of the U.S. including locations in the Great Lakes. Photo credit: USGS

Native to the southern Mississippi basin and Gulf Coast, red swamp crayfish have now been found in other parts of the U.S. including locations in the Great Lakes. Photo credit: USGS

National Invasive Species Awareness Week this year is Feb. 26 to March 2, 2018. The goal is to draw attention to invasive species and what individuals can do to stop the spread and introduction of them. This effort is sponsored by a diverse set of partners from across the country. To increase awareness of Michigan’s invasive species, Michigan State University Extension and Michigan Sea Grant are publishing a series of articles featuring resources and programs in our state working on invasive species issues.

Today’s article brings an update on the invasive red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Prior to July 14, 2017, no live red swamp crayfish had been found in Michigan although carcasses were found at a popular fishing site on the Grand River and Lake Macatawa in 2013 and 2015, respectively. However, in July 2017 red swamp crayfish were confirmed living in large numbers in a storm water retention pond in Oakland County as well as in Sunset Lake in Kalamazoo County.

According to the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN) this invasive crustacean can be up to 5 inches long including claws, although the Michigan Department of Natural Resources found individuals nearly 9 inches in 2017. Red swamp crayfish have a dark red body, claws with spiky, bright red bumps and a black wedge-shaped stripe on their underside.

Spreading through the U.S.

The red swamp crayfish is native to the Mississippi River drainage and the Gulf Coast and likely came to the Great Lakes by anglers who bought live crayfish intended for food and used it as bait or through the aquaculture industry. The Lake Erie introduction may have been intentionally released in an effort to establish populations that could then be harvested for consumption. In addition to its native range in the southern U.S., invasive populations of red swamp crayfish are now found scattered across over two dozen states.

red swamp crayfish is shown

In 2013, Michigan began prohibiting the sale of live red swamp crayfish for bait but they were still allowed for food. In 2015, Michigan law changed to prohibit the possession of all live red swamp crayfish regardless of intended purpose. Despite the regulatory actions taken, the first known establishments of red swamp crayfish in Michigan were reported in 2017. These infestations represent significant threats to Michigan’s aquatic systems. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division has developed a red swamp crayfish response plan which includes a monitoring strategy to determine the geographical distribution of infestations, working to limit new introductions, and conducting experiments to determine and implement effective chemical controls. To date, MDNR has removed over 5,000 individual crayfish.

According to MISIN, red swamp crayfish can be a host for parasites and diseases and can carry crayfish fungus plague. Once they become established, they can negatively impact an ecosystem due to its diet, which includes plants, insects, snails, fish and amphibians. It also aggressively competes for food and habitat with native crayfish and other species. This species of crayfish also digs burrows that can jeopardize shoreline stability and lead to erosion issues.

Help stop the spread

You can prevent the spread of red swamp crayfish by:

  • helping to educate others about identifying and preventing their spread.
  • Practicing the Clean, Drain and Dry method for watercraft prior to moving them between lakes. See Video
  • Disposing of unwanted fishing bait and aquarium animals in the trash.

Read the entire 2018 National Invasive Species Awareness Week series

More red swamp crayfish information

Additional invasive species resources

Clean Marina Classroom Live: South Haven

Event Date: 4/4/2018

When: April 4, 2018
Where: Northside Marina, 148 Black River St., South Haven, MI 49090
Workshop Host: Todd Newberry, Northside Marina

The Clean Marina Classroom is going on the road! In spring 2018, the Michigan Clean Marina Program will offer several in-person workshops. Michigan Sea Grant staff and Clean Marina certification specialists will cover important lessons from the online classroom tied to mandatory and recommended best practices for becoming a Clean Marina. Pledged marinas, as well as marinas due for re-certification in 2018, are invited to attend.

For the Classroom Live workshop to be effective, participants must take the following steps before the workshop:

    • Register for the workshop (dates and locations below).
    • Sign the Clean Marina pledge form (new and re-certifying marinas) and pay the required pledge fee (new marinas only).
    • Log in to the online classroom and complete the marina self-assessment (also called the certification checklist).
    • Bring your self-assessment, a notebook (paper and pencil or laptop) and your calendar to the workshop.

In return, each marina will leave with:

  • Clean Marina Classroom certificate
  • Scheduled certification site visit date
  • Prize for completing the workshop evaluation and survey

 

Hiring: Seasonal Educator

Event Date: 2/27/2018
End Date: 3/14/2018

THROUGH: Michigan State University Extension
LOCATION: Lake Erie Metropark (primary), Lake St. Clair Metropark (secondary)
$11.22 per hour
CLOSING DATE: Open until filled
TO APPLY: Contact Steve Stewart, stew@msu.edu, (586) 469-7431

This is an experiential education position for an individual to work with the Great Lakes Education Program (GLEP) and Summer Discovery Cruises (SDC) in SE Michigan. The individual will work under the supervision of the Senior District Extension Sea Grant Educator.

Primary responsibility will be vessel–based education during the Spring and Fall Great Lakes Education Program season, as well as our Summer Discovery Cruise season. Responsible with other GLEP/SDC staff for conducting varied hands‐on learning activities aboard the schoolship.

Work week for GLEP is Monday–Friday. Work week for SDC is five days, including weekends. Work may also include general duties supplemental to GLEP/SDC, such as greeting the public, maintenance, exhibit preparation assistance, and other duties assigned. Duties may also include some general youth education program work.

Bachelor’s Degree in biology, education or related field required. Must have good communication and presentation skills. Aquatic science or natural history background desired. Previous interpretive work or fieldwork preferred. Boating experience preferred. Must love working outdoors. Benefits are not included.

Lake Superior water levels nearing monthly record highs

Shoreline erosion and coastal damages likely. Water will also make its way down through the other Great Lakes, too.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Monthly forecasts for Great Lakes levels in February 2018 have just been released by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Many people are keeping a close eye on current lake levels and future predictions, particularly for Lake Superior. The preliminary data just in for January 2018, show Lake Superior just set the second highest monthly record level, a mere 2 inches below its all-time record for the monthly average January (record set in 1986). The recently released forecast also indicates a high probability Lake Superior could be within 2 inches of its all-time record high levels for every one of the next six months. Put simply, there is a lot of water in Lake Superior and all of that water will eventually make its way through the other Great Lakes.

100 years of data

Also, 2018 marks the centennial year of accurate lake level measurements from the series of binational gaging stations. The measurements for Lake Superior are taken in Duluth, Minn.; Marquette, Mich.; Pt. Iroquois, Mich.; Thunder Bay and Michipicoten, Ontario. There are now 100 years of coordinated data ­—this geographically dispersed gaging network accounts for seiches and provides excellent information – and thus 100 January monthly averages.

Isn’t Lake Superior’s water level controlled? 

The International Lake Superior Board of Control has a Regulation Plan 2012 and is responsible for regulating the outflow and control works in the St. Mary’s River. This Board has been in place since 1914 and has compensating works which allow for some limited variation. This plan must meet multiple objectives including hydropower; municipal and industrial water supply, navigation through the locks, and maintaining a minimum flow for protection of fish habitat in the St. Mary’s River. The January 2018 control board update states:

In consideration of the continuing high water levels in the upper Great Lakes, the International Lake Superior Board of Control, under authority granted to it by the International Joint Commission (IJC), will continue to release outflows of up to 2,510 cubic metres per second (m3/s) through the winter months. This flow is 100 m3/s more than the normal winter maximum prescribed by Regulation Plan 2012. Actual outflows may vary depending on hydrologic and ice conditions, as well as maintenance activities at the hydropower plants on the St. Mary’s River, all of which have been directed to flow at their maximum available capacity.” 

Additionally, the Board noted:''

“The high levels coupled with strong winds and waves have resulted in shoreline erosion and coastal damages across the upper Great Lakes system. As lake ice begins to form this may provide a level of protection to some areas of the shoreline, but additional shoreline erosion and coastal damages may occur this winter should active weather continue.”

System snow in Lake Superior impacts the spring seasonal rise as the snow turns into liquid water. We’re still in the thick of winter so time will tell if the 2018 seasonal rises are low, average, or high. Regardless of how much changes over the next few months, notable shoreline erosion and coastal damages can be expected on Lake Superior shores. (View above image)

Tools to help visualize changes

One tool for shoreline owners and other interests is the Great Lakes Shoreview risk assessment tool (http://www.greatlakesshoreviewer.org/#/great-lakes). This tool, funded by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Office of the Great Lakes, is a web-based mapping tool that shows photos from the Lake Superior shoreline, some nearshore LIDAR data, and some risk rankings.

One other tool to note is the NOAA Lake Levels Viewer tool. Similarly, this web-based mapping tool allows users to artificially fluctuate levels up or down and see impacts on the shore. The tool is found on NOAA’s Digital Coast website at https://coast.noaa.gov/llv/. Select the lake you are interested in, zoom to your geographic area, and use the legend bar to vary the lake levels. You will see impacts on the screen.

It has been a bit of a coastal dynamics wild ride, just 5 years ago all-time record-low lake levels were noted in some of the Great Lakes; now we’re dealing with almost all time highs. Keep your seat belts buckled!

Contact Mark Breederland, Michigan State University Extension Sea Grant if you want more information on living with the ever-changing dynamic coastlines of the Great Lakes.

Clean Marina Classroom Live: Harrison Township

Event Date: 3/27/2018

When: March 27, 2018
Where: Thomas Welsh Activity Center, Lake St. Clair Metropark, 31300 Metro Parkway, Harrison Township, MI 48045
Workshop Host: Joe Hall and Sue Knapp

The Clean Marina Classroom is going on the road! In spring 2018, the Michigan Clean Marina Program will offer several in-person workshops. Michigan Sea Grant staff and Clean Marina certification specialists will cover important lessons from the online classroom tied to mandatory and recommended best practices for becoming a Clean Marina. Pledged marinas, as well as marinas due for re-certification in 2018, are invited to attend.

For the Classroom Live workshop to be effective, participants must take the following steps before the workshop:

    • Register for the workshop (dates and locations below).
    • Sign the Clean Marina pledge form (new and re-certifying marinas) and pay the required pledge fee (new marinas only).
    • Log in to the online classroom and complete the marina self-assessment (also called the certification checklist).
    • Bring your self-assessment, a notebook (paper and pencil or laptop) and your calendar to the workshop.

In return, each marina will leave with:

  • Clean Marina Classroom certificate
  • Scheduled certification site visit date
  • Prize for completing the workshop evaluation and survey

Other Locations

Petoskey

When: March 14, 2018
Where: City of Petoskey Winer Sports Park, 1100 Winter Park Lane Petoskey, MI 49770
Workshop Host: Kendall Klingelsmith, City of Petoskey Marina

Clean Marina Classroom Live: Petoskey

Event Date: 3/14/2018

When: March 14, 2018
Where: City of Petoskey Winer Sports Park, 1100 Winter Park Lane Petoskey, MI 49770
Workshop Host: Kendall Klingelsmith, City of Petoskey Marina

The Clean Marina Classroom is going on the road! In spring 2018, the Michigan Clean Marina Program will offer several in-person workshops. Michigan Sea Grant staff and Clean Marina certification specialists will cover important lessons from the online classroom tied to mandatory and recommended best practices for becoming a Clean Marina. Pledged marinas, as well as marinas due for re-certification in 2018, are invited to attend.

For the Classroom Live workshop to be effective, participants must take the following steps before the workshop:

    • Register for the workshop (dates and locations below).
    • Sign the Clean Marina pledge form (new and re-certifying marinas) and pay the required pledge fee (new marinas only).
    • Log in to the online classroom and complete the marina self-assessment (also called the certification checklist).
    • Bring your self-assessment, a notebook (paper and pencil or laptop) and your calendar to the workshop.

In return, each marina will leave with:

  • Clean Marina Classroom certificate
  • Scheduled certification site visit date
  • Prize for completing the workshop evaluation and survey

Other Locations

Harrison Township

When: March 27, 2018
Where: Thomas Welsh Activity Center, Lake St. Clair Metropark, 31300 Metro Parkway, Harrison Township, MI 48045
Workshop Host: Joe Hall and Sue Knapp