Sea Grant Seeks Proposals for Aquaculture Research

Event Date: 12/15/2017
End Date: 3/30/2018

The NOAA National Sea Grant College Program 2018 Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes National Aquaculture Initiative federal funding opportunity is now open. 

Depending on appropriations, NOAA Sea Grant expects to have available a total of $7,000,000 to $11,500,000 across fiscal years 2018, 2019, and 2020 as part of the Sea Grant National Aquaculture Initiative (NAI). This federal funding competition is designed to foster the expansion of a sustainable U.S. ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes aquaculture sector by addressing one or more of the following priorities:

  • Supporting the development of emerging systems or technologies that will advance aquaculture in the U.S., including projects that will help stimulate aquaculture production by nascent industries.
  • Developing and implementing actionable methods of communicating accurate, science-based messages and information about the benefits and risks of U.S. marine aquaculture to the public. And
  • Increasing the resiliency of aquaculture systems to natural hazards and changing conditions.
Complete proposals are due from eligible parties to Sea Grant programs on March 2, 2018 at 5 p.m. local time. 
 
Applicants are strongly encouraged to reach out to their Sea Grant Program one to two months prior to the Sea Grant program application deadline to receive guidance regarding proposal development and discuss their proposed project(s). 
 
Proposals from Sea Grant programs are due in grants.gov by March 30, 2018
 
Please refer to the FFO for all planning and formal guidance. 
 

Michigan Sea Grant receives John D. Dingell Friend of the Refuge Award

Michigan Sea Grant representatives Steve Stewart and Mary Bohling with John D. Dingell, Jr., IWRA Chairman Richard Micka, and Refuge Manager John Hartig.

Michigan Sea Grant representatives Steve Stewart and Mary Bohling with John D. Dingell, Jr., IWRA Chairman Richard Micka, and Refuge Manager John Hartig. Photo by Mark Messer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

  • Rhett Register, Michigan Sea Grant Communications Lead, (734) 647-0767, rregist@umich.edu
  • Cindy Hudson, Michigan Sea Grant Extension Communications Manager, (517) 353-9723, hudsoncy@msu.edu

The International Wildlife Refuge Alliance (IWRA) and the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge recently honored the work of Michigan Sea Grant with the John D. Dingell Friend of the Refuge Award.

Michigan Sea Grant staff have been involved with both the IWRA and the Detroit River Refuge since they were organized. The IWRA recognized Michigan Sea Grant’s continued efforts in providing classroom and vessel-based education in southeast Michigan and their ongoing commitment to the mission of both the IWRA and the Refuge.

The Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge consists of nearly 6,000 acres of unique habitat, including islands, coastal wetlands, marshes, shoals, and waterfront lands within an authorized boundary extending along 48 miles of shoreline. 

The IWRA is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting the mission and purposes of the Detroit Refuge, the only international refuge in North America. It provides many vital services to the Refuge, such as community outreach, education programs, habitat restoration, special events support, volunteer staff, advocacy, and fundraising.

“The Refuge is such a wonderful asset to the Detroit area,” said Mary Bohling, a Michigan Sea Grant Extension educator. Bohling also is a current board member and one of the original organizers of the International Wildlife Refuge Alliance. “The Alliance has been an important part of building fantastic partnerships to help protect, conserve, and manage the Refuge’s wildlife and habitats. As a Sea Grant educator, I’m very proud to have been a part of making this happen.”

Since 1991, more than 100,000 students and adults have participated in Michigan Sea Grant’s Great Lakes Education Program. In addition to classroom lessons, students, teachers, and adult chaperones board the schoolship Clinton to learn more about conservation and stewardship of our state’s Great Lakes and waterways. Soon students will be boarding the schoolship at the newly constructed fishing pier and boat dock in the Detroit Refuge Gateway. The accessible dock and fishing pier are expected to open in the fall of 2017.

“We’re honored to receive this John D. Dingell Jr. Award,” said Extension Educator Steve Stewart on behalf of Michigan Sea Grant. “We’re also looking forward to welcoming many more students on board the Clinton from the new dock at the Refuge Gateway. It is critical that students have the opportunity to experience and learn about these incredible water resources, and there is no better way to do that than on a schoolship. They will be our future decision-makers and the stewards of these incredible water resources.”

The award is named after former Michigan U.S. Congressman John D. Dingell Jr., who championed many conservation causes and legislation, and who supported the creation of the Detroit Refuge.

Michigan Sea Grant helps to foster economic growth and protect Michigan’s coastal, Great Lakes resources through education, research, and outreach. A collaborative effort of the University of Michigan and Michigan State University and its MSU Extension, Michigan Sea Grant is part of the NOAA-National Sea Grant network of 33 university-based programs.

Regional network honors Michigan Sea Grant with awards

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

  • Rhett Register, Michigan Sea Grant Communications Lead, (734) 647-0767, rregist@umich.edu
  • Cindy Hudson, Michigan Sea Grant Extension Communications Manager, (517) 353-9723, hudsoncy@msu.edu

CLEVELAND – The Great Lakes Sea Grant Network recently honored the work of the Michigan Sea Grant team with several awards during its semi-annual conference in Cleveland, Ohio. The network connects regional state Sea Grant programs and assists in coordinated efforts to solve problems and manage Great Lakes resources.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension Educator Mary Bohling receives the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network’s mid-career award.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension Educator Mary Bohling receives the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network’s mid-career award.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension Educator Mary Bohling of Detroit received a mid-career award noting her excellent work during her 11-year career. Bohling serves the urban Detroit area and works with diverse populations, coastal communities, nonprofit groups, businesses, researchers and politicians applying science-based knowledge to address Great Lakes issues.

Bohling actively assists nonprofit partners in the preparation and reporting of grants, including numerous successful Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grants that have totaled nearly $30 million. Bohling is always looking for creative and interesting ways to get urban youth out on the water or bike trails, including helping to bring the Wilderness Inquiry Canoemobile to Detroit several times.

“Mary Bohling is an excellent extension educator who has strong interaction in her communities and with her colleagues. She is creative and has made — and continues to make — outstanding contributions to Michigan Sea Grant and our state,” said Heather Triezenberg, Michigan Sea Grant Extension program leader.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension Educator Brandon Schroeder receives the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network’s Distinguished Service Award.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension Educator Brandon Schroeder receives the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network’s Distinguished Service Award.

Extension Educator Brandon Schroeder of Alpena was honored with a Distinguished Service Award. Schroeder has been with Michigan Sea Grant for 13 years and serves coastal counties, encompassing 230 miles of Lake Huron shoreline in Michigan’s northeastern Lower Peninsula. Brandon’s programming focuses on the changing Lake Huron fishery, coastal tourism and business development, and youth engagement in coastal community development and stewardship.

Schroeder’s leadership and involvement in many place-based education opportunities, 4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources Camp, Center for Great Lakes Literacy, and fisheries workshops are just some of the ways he shares his expertise with stakeholders.

“His enthusiasm for his work, combined with a natural curiosity, broad knowledge base, and engaging approach to his work, combine in a way that is unique and extremely effective,” said co-worker Steve Stewart, a senior extension educator.

In addition to these individual awards, Michigan Sea Grant received the Network’s Great Lakes Outreach Programming Award for its Sustainable Small Harbors project.

The Sustainable Small Harbors project, funded by Michigan Sea Grant and a host of partners, aims to assist coastal communities in their planning efforts. The project has enabled six coastal communities with public harbors to do in-depth self-assessments, uncovering strengths and weaknesses related to their waterfront assets and to collaboratively envision their future.

The project has come at a time when harbor towns can capitalize on rebounding tourist dollars and a recovering state economy to make needed waterfront upgrades and add amenities that will increase their appeal to visitors. Team members customized and created highly interactive, public input-driven workshops, or charrettes — typically valued at tens of thousands of dollars — at no direct cost to the six case-study communities involved. The project brought together community decision-makers, harbor managers, infrastructure planners, boaters, business owners and others to come up with meaningful pathways for moving their communities forward.

“The economic and environmental health of small towns along Michigan’s coast is essential to strengthening the state’s economy and environment,” said Jim Diana, Michigan Sea Grant director. “If Michigan thrives, then the Great Lakes region as a whole benefits – and that’s why this program has been so important.”

Sustainable Small Harbor program team members Todd Marsee (left) and Mark Breederland accept the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network’s Outreach Programming Award on behalf of Michigan Sea Grant.

Sustainable Small Harbor program team members Todd Marsee (left) and Mark Breederland accept the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network’s Outreach Programming Award on behalf of Michigan Sea Grant.

Team members for the Sustainable Small Harbors project from Michigan Sea Grant included Mark Breederland, Catherine Riseng, Amy Samples and Todd Marsee. Don Carpenter from Lawrence Technological University was principal investigator. Other partners included:

Michigan State University Extension; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s Office of the Great Lakes; Michigan Department of Natural Resources Waterways Program; Michigan Development Corporation; Michigan State Housing Development Authority; Environmental Consulting and Technology, LLC; Veritas Environmental Consulting, LLC; David L. Knight, LLC; Edgewater Resources, LLC; Richard Neumann, architect; Constance Bodurow, designer.

Michigan Sea Grant helps to foster economic growth and protect Michigan’s coastal, Great Lakes resources through education, research and outreach. A collaborative effort of the University of Michigan and Michigan State University and its MSU Extension, Michigan Sea Grant is part of the NOAA-National Sea Grant network of 33 university-based programs.

Clean Marina programs extend stewardship of the Great Lakes environment

Marina on Lake Superior

Michigan Sea Grant, as coordinator of the Great Lakes Clean Marina Network, has been active in supporting environmental sensitivity in the recreational boating industry. It recently provided two grants to support Great Lakes Clean Marina programs. It also produced and distributed informational signs to all of the Clean Marina programs in the region on best practices for environmental stewardship while boating. The network also developed a list of discounts certified Clean Marinas are eligible to receive, including a 10 percent underwriting credit on general liability insurance. With an average $15,000 policy, this credit results in a savings of $1,500 per year.

Clean Marina programs work to reduce pollution to coastal waters by encouraging environmentally friendly marina and boating practices. The Great Lakes Clean Marina Network is a forum for these programs to share resources, information, and best management practices. Funding for the grants and signs was made possible by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI).

“These projects and signs help Clean Marina programs in their efforts to protect the waters and coastlines that boaters enjoy,” notes Jim Diana, Michigan Sea Grant director. “We are pleased that insurance providers see the value of this program in helping marinas be safer and cleaner.”

Two $5,000 awards were provided to Clean Marina programs in the Great Lakes Region. The Wisconsin Clean Marina Program will expand program participation and certifications by increasing in-person technical assistance and improving program promotion, outreach, and training. The Ohio Clean Marina Program will create a model illustrating Clean Marina best management practices (BMPs) and how an “ideal” clean marina may function and appear. They will also work with agency experts to develop voluntary BMPs not already included in the certification criteria to address additional marina needs and goals.

All funded projects will report to the Great Lakes Clean Marina Network to share best practices and lessons learned.

To learn more about the Great Lakes Clean Marina Network and view a list of discounts available to certified Clean Marinas, visit glcleanmarina.org.

Contacts:
Catherine Riseng, Research Program Manager, (734) 936-3622, criseng@umich.edu
Rhett Register, Communications Program Leader, (734) 647-0767, rregist@umich.edu

2017 John D. Dingell Friend of the Refuge Award

The Great Lakes – Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario, and their connecting channels – form the largest surface fresh water system on earth. Michigan is at the heart of that system, surrounded by four of the five Great Lakes. Through research, education and outreach, Michigan Sea Grant is dedicated to the protection and sustainable use of the Great Lakes and coastal resources.

Michigan Sea Grant is a cooperative program of the University of Michigan (UM) and Michigan State University (MSU). It is also part of a national network of more than 30 university-based Sea Grant programs in coastal states across the country, administered through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Each Sea Grant program has three components: research, education and outreach.

Nearly 110,000 students and adults have learned more about the Great Lakes since 1991 by participating in the Great Lakes Education Program. Designed though a collaboration involving Michigan State University Extension, Michigan Sea Grant, the Huron-Clinton Metroparks, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the program provides students, their teachers and adult chaperones with an unforgettable on-the-water learning experience. The school ship Clinton will soon provide this on-the-water experience from the newly constructed fishing pier in the Refuge Gateway allowing thousands who share a common ownership of, and stewardship responsibility for, our great lakes.

Michigan Sea Grant staff has been involved in the DRIWR and IWRA since their inception in variety of ways. Today we recognize Michigan Sea Grant for their continued efforts in providing 26 years of classroom and vessel-based education in southeast Michigan and their commitment to furthering the mission of IWRA and the Refuge.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension educator Dan O’Keefe receives Dr. Howard A. Tanner Award

Michigan Steelhead and Salmon Fishermen’s Association honors O’Keefe’s contributions to sport fishery.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension educator Dr. Dan O’Keefe (right) recently received the Dr. Howard Tanner Award from the Michigan Steelheaders and Salmon Fishermen’s Association. Dr. Tanner is shown at left.

Michigan Sea Grant Extension educator Dr. Dan O’Keefe (right) recently received the Dr. Howard Tanner Award from the Michigan Steelheaders and Salmon Fishermen’s Association. Dr. Tanner is shown at left. Courtesy photo

The Michigan Steelhead and Salmon Fisherman’s Association recently awarded Michigan Sea Grant Extension educator Dr. Daniel O’Keefe with the Dr. Howard A. Tanner Award for his contributions to Michigan’s sport fishery.

“Dan O’Keefe believes education is a critical component of natural resource management and the importance of knowledge in making sound decisions has been the cornerstone of his contributions to our anadromous sport fishery,” said Dennis Eade, Michigan Steelheaders executive director.

O’Keefe, a Michigan State University Extension educator who serves seven counties along the coast of Lake Michigan, graduated from MSU with a bachelor’s of science degree in Fisheries and Wildlife. He received his master’s in biology at Central Michigan University and his doctorate in Wildlife and Fisheries from Mississippi State University. He has been with Michigan Sea Grant for nine years.

O’Keefe has developed many education and outreach programs, including:

  • Citizen science programs such as the Salmon Ambassadors and the Great Lakes Angler Diary.
  • Organizes fishery workshops and brings together fisheries managers, biologists, scientists, state and federal agency personnel, charter fishing captains and sport fishers alike to consider what is occurring in the ecosystem and what will impact the sustainability of the Great Lakes fishery.
  • Completed study of charter and tournament fishing economic impacts and post-study evaluation that indicated results led to greater appreciation for the value of a healthy Great Lakes ecosystem.
  • Compiled public input on controversial issues. Coordinated with Michigan DNR regarding fisheries issues in preparation for basin-wide management plans, a governor-appointed council regarding development of offshore wind energy legislation, and a Michigan House of Representatives committee regarding Asian carp and other invasive species.

“Dr. Howard Tanner is an icon in the fisheries world and I’m honored to be receiving an award named after him,” O’Keefe said. “It’s important to me that citizens receive the best available scientific information and get involved in Great Lakes fisheries management.”

Tanner served as Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division chief during the 1960s and was key in bringing about salmon stocking in the Great Lakes. He was then director of Natural Resource at MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and eventually returned to the state as MDNR director.

The Michigan Steelhead and Salmon Fishermen’s Association is the largest sport fishing association in the Great Lakes Basin and has 14 chapters throughout Michigan which protect, promote and enhance sport fishing in the Great Lakes and connecting waterways.

NOAA Marine Debris Calendar celebrates student voices, student art

Alpena students bring a Great Lakes perspective to the global marine debris issue.

Malley M., an eighth-grade student at All Saints Catholic School in Alpena, Mich., displays her winning artwork. Malley's illustration is the November calendar page in the NOAA Marine Debris Calendar. Courtesy photo

Malley M., an eighth-grade student at All Saints Catholic School in Alpena, Mich., displays her winning artwork. Malley’s illustration is the November calendar page in the NOAA Marine Debris Calendar. Courtesy photo

A new year is just around the corner – and it’s also an opportunity to celebrate a local youth leader who is featured in the national 2017 NOAA Marine Debris Calendar. This year’s calendar showcases the artwork of Malley M., a 2015-16 eighth-grade student at All Saints Catholic School in Alpena, Mich. Connected to that classroom’s efforts to raise awareness about plastic pollution in the Great Lakes, Malley’s art was chosen as one of twelve young artists contributing to the annual calendar. She not only created an imaginative, eye-catching piece of art for this competition, but she also applied her school skills in addressing this marine debris issue locally.

In her achievement, she represents her broader team of classmates, educators, school, and community. Her teacher, Alecia Deitz, engages students – through their learning – in environmental stewardship projects aimed at enhancing their local community. Supported by the Northeast Michigan Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative (NEMIGLSI) network, the All Saints School educator team explores local issues and community needs through a place-based stewardship education (PBSE) (PDF) instructional process. Through this network, educators and students first investigated the issue of marine debris and plastic pollution in the Great Lakes – an issue commonly connected with our world’s ocean but sometimes forgotten about here locally in our Great Lakes.

Through the NEMIGLSI network, students connected with the  Alliance for the Great Lakes, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Michigan Sea Grant, Michigan State University Extension and Huron Pines AmeriCorps who support their efforts to raise awareness toward marine debris and plastic pollution. Place-based stewardship education is more than an art or science project – rather it reflects hands-on, student-engaged, and interdisciplinary learning experiences for students, educators, and their community. Malley’s artwork reflects an educational aspect of their project, and other All Saints student leaders across multiple grades also investigated this issue locally.

During the 2015-16 school year, students launched a marine debris and consumption investigation by watching Bag It: Is your life too plastic?  Next seventh- and eight-graders completed cafeteria audits for single-use versus reusable plastics, and applying math, they calculated over 1,500 single-use items in their cafeteria. After collecting data, they hosted a schoolwide assembly, where they highlighted the impact of the marine debris on the environment and shared the collected weekly tally for single-use plastics. They challenged their school and classmates to reduce single-use plastics and offered alternatives like skipping straws or using reusable containers in trade for plastic sandwich bags. The following week, they tracked single-use plastics in their cafeteria again, and found a decrease to less than 900 single-use items!  Cafeteria staff contributed also by switching from disposable to reusable silverware.

Expanding their work into the community, students presented their research during the Thunder Bay International Film Festival, setting up an educational table and presented as part of a plastic outreach panel of partners, students, and educators on the issue of marine debris. Through this opportunity, students shared with their community what they have learned about the environmental impacts of marine debris and how citizens can take steps to reduce single use plastics in their lives.

That spring, students then partnered in the NOAA Students for Zero Waste Week. Prior to their weeklong effort, seventh- and eighth-graders hosted another schoolwide presentation to remind students why it is import to reduce waste and energy use. Following the presentation, K-12 students completed litter cleanups on schoolgrounds and made art from trash among other activities. The weeklong efforts culminated with a student-planned Friday Earth Day Celebration complete with a ‘Trashion’ show and lots of hands-on activities related to marine debris and ways to reuse trash. This fun event offered a forum for trading educational and inspiring information and ideas on how to connect learning toward environmental stewardship and betterment of their community.

close up of drawing of marine debris art

During their Zero Waste Week, All Saints seventh- and eighth-graders led the Northeast Michigan Earth Day Bag Project effort at their school with fourth-graders. After showing short videos to highlight how marine debris impacts our ocean they discussed the issue locally with students. In April, students across northeast Michigan collaborate with different schools, community partners, and area grocery stores to raise awareness about the importance of reducing plastic use and reusing items (such as cloth bags) through student-decorated paper grocery bags. The end-product is student decorated bags to raise awareness in area grocery stores on Earth Day, but it also serves as a tool to integrate science, art, and English language arts in one effort.

During the current school year, sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders and lead teacher, Alecia Deitz, continue to explore the marine debris issue locally as a tool for classroom learning. They made ornaments out of trash collected by area students during Alliance for the Great Lakes Adopt-a-Beach in Alpena; and the students’ work is currently on display this holiday season at the Besser Museum for Northeast Michigan highlighting the effects of plastic pollution on our environment and Great Lakes.

Through place-based stewardship education efforts, these students apply their learning to better protect our Great Lakes by raising awareness about the issue of marine debris while shifting culture in their school and community toward reducing plastic waste.

Michigan Sea Grant Supports Great Lakes Clean Marina Programs

clean marina sailboat - with logo-2

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Amy Samples, Coastal Resilience Specialist, (734) 647-0766, asamples@umich.edu
Rhett Register, Communications Program Leader, (734) 647-0767, rregist@umich.edu

Michigan Sea Grant, as coordinator of the Great Lakes Clean Marina Network, recently provided small grants to support the administration of Great Lakes Clean Marina Programs in 2016. This funding opportunity was made possible by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

Clean Marina programs work to reduce pollution to coastal waters by encouraging environmentally friendly marina and boating practices. The Great Lakes Clean Marina Network is a forum for these programs to share resources, information and best management practices.

“These projects will help to facilitate implementation, operation, or expansion of a Clean Marina Program in these states,” notes Jim Diana, Michigan Sea Grant director.

The awards were provided to four projects in four states.

The Michigan Clean Marina Program received $5,000. The award will be used to provide ten $500 scholarships to marinas to offset fees, staff time and other costs associated with becoming certified or maintaining certification as a Clean Marina.

The Wisconsin Clean Marina Program received $5,000 to be used as salary and to offset travel costs for their program coordinator. The Wisconsin clean marina coordinator helps marinas certify or recertify, runs training workshops for marina owners and employees, and promotes the program in the state.

The Minnesota Clean Marina Program received $2,500 to offset the costs of travel and supplies for program volunteers that target Lake Superior marinas. The Minnesota Clean Marina Program is 100 percent volunteer-based.

Finally, the Ohio Clean Marina Program received $5,000 to support program evaluation in conjunction with their 10-year anniversary. The program will develop and administer a survey to 270 marinas in the Lake Erie watershed in an effort to inform a new outreach strategy and program expansion.

All funded projects will report back to the Great Lakes Clean Marina Network to share best practices and lessons learned.

To learn more about the Great Lakes Clean Marina Network, visit: www.miseagrant.umich.edu/great-lakes-clean-marina.

Three new marina certifications and one re-certified as Michigan Clean Marinas

New clean marinas july-2015

For Immediate Release

Contact: Nicki Polan, MBIA, (734) 261-0123
Jeff Spencer, MDEQ, (517) 241-5719

Livonia, Mich. – The Michigan Clean Marina Program is pleased to announce three Michigan marinas have been named as Certified Clean Marinas. They are: Tower Marine, Douglas; Saugatuck Yacht Services, Saugatuck; and Windjammer Marina, Oden. All three have been certified for a three-year term through 2018. Additionally, one marina has been re-certified as a “Michigan Clean Marina”; it is Petoskey City Marina, Petoskey. Petoskey City Marina has been re-certified for another five-year-term through 2020. Forty-five Michigan marinas have obtained and are maintaining this prestigious certification.

The Clean Marina Program was initiated to preserve and protect, through voluntary efforts, Michigan’s greatest resource, the Great Lakes and its connecting waterways. The certification process begins with a pledge to participate in the program, followed by an online course with an overview of the designation process and a review of best management practices. The facilities then conduct self evaluations of their environmental practices to determine their strengths and weaknesses. After implementing improvements and reaching a level of competencies, the marina requests a visitation by a CMP consultant to evaluate the facility’s environmental stewardship. When the facility reaches established goals, they receive their designation.

“We welcome Tower Marine, Saugatuck Yacht Services, and Windjammer Marina to the Clean Marina Program and we praise Petoskey City Marina for being re-certified as a Certified Clean Marina and for their continuation of following best practices,” said Nicki Polan, executive director of the Michigan Boating Industries Association. “More boaters are becoming aware of the program and are searching out these facilities as places they want to patronize.” The Clean Marina designation is applicable for a three-year period at which time the facility must be re-designated. MBIA encourages all marinas to seek out this certification. “It is not difficult and there are both financial and environmental gains that come with this effort,” said Polan. Currently Michigan has 45 Clean Marinas.

The Michigan Clean Marina Program is a joint program between the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan Boating Industries Association. For more details on the program and to see which facilities are designated, see these websites:

Megan Dodson Receives 2014 Van Snider Award

Megan Dodson award winner 612px

Megan Dodson (right), meteorologist with the National Weather Service, was awarded the 2014 Van Snider Award by Elizabeth LaPorte (left).

Megan Dodson, meteorologist with the National Weather Service, was awarded the 2014 Van Snider Award. Dodson is a leader in coastal hazards outreach and a great partner to Michigan Sea Grant. She is an inspiration to others with her water safety education efforts, participating in the Life of Lake Superior Youth Program and other community based committees. She has partnered with Michigan Sea Grant for many years on various dangerous current projects.

Currently, Megan is partnering with MSG on two dangerous currents projects:

  • In 2013, she helped with the agenda and presented at three full-day educational workshops to train park personnel about dangerous currents.
  • Megan, along with Michigan Sea Grant, developed a searchable Great Lakes Current Incident Database. Her ongoing research has determined that structural currents are a significant factor in fatalities in Michigan and the region. This has been a game changer for our outreach efforts.

Our Sea Grant team has come to rely not only on Megan’s expertise, but her enthusiasm for her work.

About the Award

Michigan Sea Grant established the Van Snider Award in 2010. Who is Van Snider? Snider is the former President of the Michigan Boating Industry Association and a long-time partner and friend of Michigan Sea Grant. Through his work, he has exemplified what it means to be a partner — he is considerate, willing to help, diplomatic and a great, all-around resource. The inaugural award was given to Snider and has been given out periodically to recognize individual partners who have gone above and beyond.