Great Lakes Water Safety 2017 Conference

Event Date: 4/20/2017
End Date: 4/21/2017

Registration is open for water safety conference focused on ending drownings in the Great Lakes

ANN ARBOR, MI – Drownings in the Great Lakes were up 78 percent last year over the previous year. The Great Lakes Water Safety Consortium (GLWSC) is committed to ending drowning in the Great Lakes through collaboration, education, and action. The consortium will host the Great Lakes Water Safety 2017 Conference April 20-21 in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Presenters include first responders, wave and current research scientists, meteorologists, lifeguards, and other water safety experts and advocates from around the Great Lakes region.

“We know why drownings were up, and we know what we can do to bring them back down,” says Jamie Racklyeft, executive director of the GLWSC and rip current survivor. “Attendees will learn the latest research on dangerous waves and currents and how to avoid, escape, and safely save others from them.”

The conference will feature life-saving demonstrations and the latest drone technology being used to rescue people caught in the grip of rip currents and other dangerous conditions.

Who Should Attend?
Everyone is welcome to attend and learn about ways to end drowning. Parents, community leaders, teachers, police officers, firefighters, EMTs, park rangers, the media – anyone who wants to keep people safe as they enjoy the Great Lakes.

For more information about the conference, for training referrals, or to join the consortium for free, visit: GreatLakesWaterSafety.org

Contact:
Great Lakes Water Safety Consortium
Jamie Racklyeft
734-358-8982
jracklye@gmail.com  

GLWSC ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Twitter: www.twitter.com/GLWaterSafety
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ABOUT THE GLWSC
The Great Lakes Water Safety Consortium is a community of BEST practice, connecting all groups and individuals interested in water safety to maximize our collective knowledge, resources, and actions to END DROWNING in the Great Lakes.