News and Events

Great Lakes 4-H Camp

Event Date: 7/31/2016
End Date: 8/6/2016

The 4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resource camp offers great outdoor hands-on learning experiences for students 13-15 years old. The annual camp runs for one week, held in late July or early August on the northern shores of Lake Huron in Presque Isle, Michigan.

Have Fun Outdoors

Campers can do things like explore dunes, hike through the forests, and wade through wetlands, or fish, snorkel and sail on Lake Huron — all while learning about their surroundings from natural resource professionals, teachers and science researchers.

About Camp

Camp Chickagami, is located between Alpena and Rogers City. Camp Chickagami has dormitory-style housing, small cabins, a dining hall, toilet and shower facilities. Meals will be prepared and served in the dining hall by a qualified cook. See sample Camp Schedule below.

The camp is leased for this program by Michigan 4-H Youth Development from the Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Michigan. It is operated as a camp licensed by the State of Michigan and directed by Michigan 4-H Youth Development. You do not need to be a 4-H member to attend.

Fees

Camp fees include meals, lodging, program and activity costs. Note that nearly half of the expenses of the program are covered by sponsors. Some scholarships are available. For up to date information, see camp costs.

Awards

  • 2008 National 4-H Program of Distinction
  • 2009 National 4-H and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Natural Resources Conservation Education Award (camp is a MSU Pre-College Program)

Sponsors

IAGLR 2016

Event Date: 6/6/2016
End Date: 6/10/2016

Fellow researchers from around the world will gather at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario, for IAGLR’s 59th annual Conference on Great Lakes Research. A great program is in store with four days of scientific sessions and speakers focusing on our theme Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales.

Learn more

Project F.I.S.H. volunteer training workshops

Event Date: 5/17/2016
End Date: 5/25/2016

Program helps mentor next generation of anglers

Mark Stephens of Project F.I.S.H. teaches Saginaw Bay youth about fish anatomy. Photo: Michigan Sea Grant

Mark Stephens of Project F.I.S.H. teaches Saginaw Bay youth about fish anatomy. Photo: Michigan Sea Grant

Project F.I.S.H. is an award-winning youth fishing and mentorship program working to preserve fishing as part of Michigan’s natural heritage and foster the next generation of anglers to enjoy and care for the state’s rich fishing resources.

MSU Extension and Michigan Sea Grant are partnering with 4-Hand Project F.I.S.H. to bring a new series of youth fishing education opportunities to the Saginaw Bay region. Volunteers are needed to help make this new series of youth and family fishing initiatives possible!

A three-session workshop will be held in May in Bay City, offering Project F.I.S.H. training for Saginaw Bay region volunteers. The partnership received a grant from the Dow Corning Foundation with support from the Saginaw Community Foundation to make this training free to residents of Bay and Saginaw counties.

During the training workshops volunteers will:

  • Learn hands-on youth-focused methods for teaching a variety of topics including tackle crafting, angling skills, aquatic ecology, and fisheries management and ethics.
  • Connect with youth fishing education partners and volunteer opportunities in the Saginaw Bay region.
  • Receive a toolbox of fishing education materials that includes a spincast rod and reel, backyard bass game, tackle box, tackle crafting supplies, bluegill fish print mold, a stewardship project guide and the full Project F.I.S.H. curriculum with detailed instructions for over 100 fishing education activities.

The program will be held 6-9 p.m. May 17, 18 and 25 at Handy Middle School cafeteria, 601 Blend Street, Bay City. Register online before May 13, enrollment is limited.

For questions or additional information contact Katy Hintzen at hintzen@msu.edu or (989) 891-7198.

Sea Grant 50th Anniversary: Celebrating the work of our Extension educators

Great Lakes literacy is something Steve Stewart takes seriously

Steve Stewart has taught Great Lakes literacy lessons to thousands of schoolchildren over the years. Photo: Michigan Sea Grant

Steve Stewart has taught Great Lakes literacy lessons to thousands of schoolchildren over the years. Photo: Michigan Sea Grant

In 2016, the National Sea Grant College Program is celebrating its 50 years of putting science to work for America’s coastal communities.

Sea Grant is a federal-state partnership that turns research into action by supporting science-based, environmentally sustainable practices that ensure coastal communities remain engines of economic growth in a rapidly changing world. There are 33 programs across the country working to help build and grow innovative businesses along America’s oceans and Great Lakes, protect against environmental destruction and natural disasters, and train the next generation of leaders.

Established in 1969, Michigan Sea Grant, is a collaboration between Michigan State University and the University of Michigan. We offer research, education and community outreach on topics such as aquatic invasive species, coastal development, commercial and sports fishing, and environmental stewardship for youth.

Our MSU Extension educators live and work in coastal communities around Michigan. We celebrate their hard work and take this opportunity to introduce each of them during this anniversary year.

Steve Stewart IMG_0612 copySteve Stewart, located in Macomb County and serving the seven coastal counties in southeast and east Michigan from Monroe through Tuscola, has been an Extension Educator since 1977, when he and Charles Pistis were hired as the first field-based Michigan Sea Grant outreach staff members at Michigan State University. Previously, the program had been based solely at the University of Michigan, with one field staff member—Tom Kelly, who later founded the Inland Seas Education Association—working in northwest Michigan.

Steve received his undergraduate degree in zoology from Miami University, but quickly realized he’d need a graduate degree in order to work in a profession allowing him to pursue his fascination with the world of water. Before heading southwest to Texas A&M University, where he received his M.S. in Marine Resources Management, he began SCUBA diving and explored some of the well-known shipwrecks of Lake Huron, which proved to be directly relevant in his Extension career.

What made you decide to be an Extension Educator?

Steve first learned about Sea Grant while a graduate student. Texas A&M University was among the first Sea Grant programs established, and he liked the research-outreach networks that Sea Grant developed. His graduate program was multidisciplinary, and that fit well with the breadth of topics addressed by the outreach side of Sea Grant. And the fact that his graduation came just before the first Michigan Sea Grant Extension positions were created provided an ideal opportunity.

How has Michigan Sea Grant made a difference over the years?

Looking back at programming successes throughout his career, Steve highlights:

  • the cold water near-drowning research that led to statewide training for emergency medical professionals, with resulting protocol changes that continue to save lives every year;
  • development of the Thumb Area and Sanilac Shores Underwater Preserves in southern Lake Huron, which led to enhanced tourism and artifact preservation;
  • development of computer models to help marina owners determine the profitability of facility development/expansion, and help coastal communities assess the feasibility of various waterfront development options;
  • counseling shoreline property owners about the realities of living with fluctuating Great Lakes water levels, and developing software tools to guide them in choosing best practices for protecting their coastal property and structures;
  • helping to create the 4H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp, which has provided teens with an opportunity to experience and learn about the lakes while developing leadership skills since it began in1983;
  • development of the Great Lakes Education Program, which has served more than 105,000 learners from nearly 300 schools in southeast Michigan since 1991;
  • creation of Summer Discovery Cruises to provide a way for the public to learn about the Great Lakes;
  • working with regional colleagues to develop COSEE Great Lakes (Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence) and serving as the outreach/education member on the Great Lakes Observing System developmental committee;
  • and the post-COSEE development of the Center for Great Lakes Literacy, through which educators are provided with career-changing professional development opportunities.

What challenges does your area of the state face as you look to the future?

The Great Lakes are among Michigan’s greatest assets, so you would expect Great Lakes literacy and stewardship in the Great Lakes State to be high. Unfortunately this is not the case. The next generation of decision-makers needs to be better prepared to address important Great Lakes resource management issues. Michigan Sea Grant will continue to meet this need by engaging students, their teachers and the public in opportunities such as the Great Lakes Education Program, 4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp, the Center for Great Lakes Literacy, and our Summer Discovery Cruises.

Aquatic invasive species and their many impacts on the Great Lakes will continue to be a challenge, and Michigan Sea Grant will continue to work toward reducing the introduction of new species and mitigating the impacts of those already present.

Do you have any advice for students who might want to pursue a career with an environmental focus?

For students interested in careers with an environmental focus, Steve recommends first becoming informed about the diverse career options that exist. Start with resources such as Marine Careers: A Sea Grant guide to Ocean Opportunities and OceanCareers.com. Build a network of contacts in the fields that most interest you as you develop the necessary knowledge and skills for your future career. And work hard, whether engaged in a university degree program or advanced technology training, to make your goal a reality.

If you could get people to follow just one piece of conservation advice what would it be?

The Great Lakes belong to all of us collectively, and we all share a responsibility to be good stewards of these incredible natural resources.

Digital Coast Fellowship Opportunity

Event Date: 5/6/2016

NOAA digital coast fellowship
The NOAA Office for Coastal Management is recruiting candidates for three Digital Coast Fellowship opportunities in 2016. This program is modeled after the Coastal Management fellowship program and has a similar mission: to provide on-the-job education and training opportunities in coastal resource management and policy for postgraduate students and to provide project assistance to Digital Coast Partnership organizations.

Three Digital Coast Partnership organizations will be selected as hosts for these fellowships. Digital Coast Partnership organizations include: American Planning Association, Association of State Floodplain Managers, Coastal States Organization, National Association of Counties, National Estuarine Research Reserve Association, National States Geographic Information Council, The Nature Conservancy, and Urban Land Institute.

For the 2016 fellowship, applicants must complete a master’s, doctoral, or professional degree at an accredited U.S. university between January 1, 2015, and July 31, 2016, to be eligible.

A broad range of degrees are applicable to the fellowship because the projects are varied among the partner organizations. This two-year opportunity starts in August 2016, and offers a competitive salary, medical benefits, and travel and relocation expense reimbursement.

Application packages must be submitted to the NOAA Office for Coastal Management by Friday, May 6, 2016, at ocm.fellowships@noaa.gov.

Additional details:

Lake St. Clair Fisheries Workshop, Harrison Twp

Event Date: 4/14/2016

The fisheries workshop offers current research and information related to the status of the Lake St. Clair fishery. Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension, in partnership with the Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division, will be hosting an evening regional workshop dedicated to Lake St. Clair.

The workshop is open to the public, and will provide valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals, and other community members interested in attending.

Date: Thursday, April 14th
Time: 6:00 — 9:00 p.m.
Location: Sportsmen’s Direct, 38989 Jefferson Ave, Harrison Charter Township, MI 48045
Workshop Registration: Workshop is no cost to participants, however pre-registration is requested (see contacts below), but walk-in participation is always welcomed!

The workshop will include five presentations:

  • Invasive species of the Huron-Erie Corridor
    Dr. Rochelle Sturtevant, Great Lakes Regional Sea Grant Extension Educator, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL)
  • Ongoing efforts of Macomb County to improve access to Lake St. Clair
    Gerard Santoro, Macomb County Program Manager – Land and Water Resources Group
  • Effects of fishing on bass: Lessons from Michigan and Connecticut
    Jan-Michael Hessenauer, Fisheries Research Biologist, MIDNR Lake St. Clair Fisheries Research Station
  • Lake St. Clair Fishery Status Update
    Mike Thomas and Todd Wills, Fisheries Research Biologists from the MIDNR Lake St. Clair Fisheries Research Station
  • Are there really too many muskie in Lake St. Clair?
    Mike Thomas and Todd Wills, Fisheries Research Biologists from the MIDNR Lake St. Clair Fisheries Research Station

To register, please contact:
Maureen Prisbe
MSU Extension – Macomb County Office
(586) 469-6440
maureen.prisbe@macombgov.org

Program information or questions, contact:
Justin Selden
Michigan Sea Grant
(586) 469-7139
seldenju@anr.msu.edu

Lake Huron Fisheries Workshop, Alpena

Event Date: 4/27/2016

You are invited to join and participate this spring in the upcoming 2016 Lake Huron Regional Fisheries Workshops offering current research and information relating to the status of our Lake Huron fishery. This workshop is open to the public at no cost; however, pre-registration is requested.

Alpena
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016
Time: 6:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Where: NOAA Great Lakes Maritime Heritage Center, 500 W. Fletcher St., Alpena, MI 49707

The Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension, in partnership with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division, the USGS Great Lakes Science Center and local fishery organizations will host four regional workshops locally along Lake Huron’s coastline. These annual spring Lake Huron fisheries workshops bring communities together with fisheries research and management partners to discuss research findings, management updates, and fishing trends. Read more.

Four evening workshops, hosted across the state, are open to the public and will offer valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals and other community members interested in the Lake Huron fishery.

Visit our Regional Workshops webpage for latest details and updates on fisheries workshops around the state. Please contact Brandon Schroeder, Michigan Sea Grant (989-354-9885 or schroe45@msu.edu) with any questions regarding Lake Huron workshops.

Lake Huron Fisheries Workshop, Cedarville

Event Date: 4/26/2016

You are invited to join and participate this spring in the upcoming 2016 Lake Huron Regional Fisheries Workshops offering current research and information relating to the status of our Lake Huron fishery. This workshop is open to the public at no cost; however, pre-registration is requested.

Cedarville
Date: Tuesday, April 26, 2016
Time: 6:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Where: Clark Township Community Center, 133 E. M-134, Cedarville, MI 49719

The Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension, in partnership with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division, the USGS Great Lakes Science Center and local fishery organizations will host four regional workshops locally along Lake Huron’s coastline. These annual spring Lake Huron fisheries workshops bring communities together with fisheries research and management partners to discuss research findings, management updates, and fishing trends. Read more.

Four evening workshops, hosted across the state, are open to the public and will offer valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals and other community members interested in the Lake Huron fishery.

Visit our Regional Workshops webpage for latest details and updates on fisheries workshops around the state. Please contact Brandon Schroeder, Michigan Sea Grant (989-354-9885 or schroe45@msu.edu) with any questions regarding Lake Huron workshops.

Lake Huron Fisheries Workshop, Ubly/Bad Axe

Event Date: 4/21/2016

You are invited to join and participate this spring in the upcoming 2016 Lake Huron Regional Fisheries Workshops offering current research and information relating to the status of our Lake Huron fishery. This workshop is open to the public at no cost; however, pre-registration is requested.

Ubly/Bad Axe
Date: Thursday, April 21, 2016
Time: 6:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Where: Ubly Fox Hunter’s Club, 2153 Ubly Rd, Ubly, MI  48475

The Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension, in partnership with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division, the USGS Great Lakes Science Center and local fishery organizations will host four regional workshops locally along Lake Huron’s coastline. These annual spring Lake Huron fisheries workshops bring communities together with fisheries research and management partners to discuss research findings, management updates, and fishing trends. Read more.

Four evening workshops, hosted across the state, are open to the public and will offer valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals and other community members interested in the Lake Huron fishery.

Visit our Regional Workshops webpage for latest details and updates on fisheries workshops around the state. Please contact Brandon Schroeder, Michigan Sea Grant (989-354-9885 or schroe45@msu.edu) with any questions regarding Lake Huron workshops.

Lake Huron Fisheries Workshop, Bay City

Event Date: 4/19/2016

You are invited to join and participate this spring in the upcoming 2016 Lake Huron Regional Fisheries Workshops offering current research and information relating to the status of our Lake Huron fishery. This workshop is open to the public at no cost; however, pre-registration is requested.

Bay City
Date: Tuesday, April 19, 2016
Time: 6:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Where: Knights of Columbus Hall, 360 S. River Rd. (M-13), Bay City, MI 48708

The Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension, in partnership with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division, the USGS Great Lakes Science Center and local fishery organizations will host four regional workshops locally along Lake Huron’s coastline. These annual spring Lake Huron fisheries workshops bring communities together with fisheries research and management partners to discuss research findings, management updates, and fishing trends. Read more.

Four evening workshops, hosted across the state, are open to the public and will offer valuable information for anglers, charter captains, resource professionals and other community members interested in the Lake Huron fishery.

Visit our Regional Workshops webpage for latest details and updates on fisheries workshops around the state. Please contact Brandon Schroeder, Michigan Sea Grant (989-354-9885 or schroe45@msu.edu) with any questions regarding Lake Huron workshops.